The Portrait of The Lady.



The Portrait of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.The Portrait Of The Lady.

C1. Answer the following questions:

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Question 1.
Read paragraph 2. There are a few sentences which speak about the grandmother’s features. Pick out those sentences and write them.
Answer:
She had always been short and fat and slightly bent. Her face was a crisscross of wrinkles running from everywhere to everywhere. She could never have been pretty, but she was always beautiful.

Question 2.
“……… she used to get me ready for school”. How did the grandmother get the author ready for school?
Answer:
The grandmother used to wake the author up in the morning and get him ready for school. She would fetch his wooden slate which she had already washed and plastered with yellow chalk, a tiny earthen ink-pot and red pen, tie them all in a bundle and hand it to him. After a breakfast of thick stale chapattis with a little butter and sugar spread on it, they would leave for school.

Question 3.
Why did the grandmother accompany the author to the school?
Answer:
The grandmother accompanied the author to the school because the school was attached to the temple. She would sit there to say her prayers and read the scriptures.

 

Question 4.
“That was a turning point in our friendship”. What was the ‘turning point’?
Answer:
When the author’s parents were settled in the city, they called the author and grandmother to come there. That was the turning point. Though the author and grandmother shared the same room, she did not go with him to the school. She gradually remained away from his activities and him.

Question 5.
What made the grandmother unhappy? Why?
Answer:
In the village, the temple priest used to teach the alphabet and the morning prayer. That was ‘schooling’, according to the grandmother. But, in the city school, the author had to learn modern education with English, Science, Mathematics, etc. When he came back from school she would ask him about the lessons. But she understood very little of it. As there was no teaching.about God and scriptures, she felt unhappy.

C2. Discuss the following questions and present them before the class:

Question 1.
“The thought was almost revolting”. What is ‘the thought’ referred to? Why does the author use the word ‘revolting’ to describe the thought?
Answer:
‘The thought’ refers to the concept of grandmother being ‘young and pretty’. The author had seen her for the last twenty years as the ‘same, old, wrinkled’ woman. He couldn’t imagine her in any younger condition. If anybody told him to imagine her as young, it would be totally opposite of his perception of ‘grandmother’. So he says the thought itself was ‘revolting’.

Question 2.
How did the grandmother help the author as a boy during the school days?
Answer:
The author’s parents had left him with his grandmother when they went to live in the city. The author and his grandmother were good friends. She used to wake him up early in the morning, bathe him and dress him, all the while singingthe morning prayer which the author used to like listening to.

She used to pack his wooden slate, a small earthen Ink-pot, his red pen all in a bundle and give him after providing him with a breakfast of a thick chapathi smeared with ghee and sugar. She then used to drop him to school, wait at the temple reading scriptures and after school, bring him back home.

 

Question 3.
Describe the relation between (animals/birds) – dogs and sparrows and the grandmother.
Answer:
The grandmother used to feed street dogs with pieces of chapattis when the grandmother and grandson duo returned home from the ‘temple-school’. At a later stage, in the city, when the author was engrossed in his higher studies, she used to spend some time feeding birds like sparrows. They had become so friendly with her that they would perch on her legs.

When the grandmother died, thousands of sparrows sat around the corpse without any chirping, all in silence. They did not touch the bread crumbs which the author’s mother had thrown for them. They flew away quietly when the dead body was carried off and never came back.

Question 4.
Describe the three stages in the relationship between the author and his grandmother (before he went abroad).
Answer:
The first stage of the author’s relationship with his grandmother started when he was still a child. The old lady used to tell him and other children of the games she used to play as a child. Her stories not only looked quite funny, they also seemed quite strange and exaggerated. The author did not take them seriously.

The second stage of this relationship began when the narrator started going to school. His parents left him with her and they went to live in the city. They were constantly together. She used to wake him up in the morning and get him ready for school. Then she would fetch his wooden slate, a tiny earthen inkpot, and a red pen. After a breakfast of a thick, stale chapatti, they went to school. She carried several chapattis for the village dogs. The school was attached to the temple where she would sit and pray. They would walk back together after school.

The third stage of their relationship began when the narrator’s parents sent for them in the city. That was a turning point in their friendship. He used to go to an English school in a motor bus. As the years rolled by they saw less of each other. She didn’t like the English school as there was no teaching about God and scriptures there. She hated western science and music. When he went up to university he was given a room of his own. The common link of their friendship was snapped. His grandmother accepted her seclusion with resignation.

Question 5.
Grandmother and prayer were inseparable. Find instances from the lesson to justify this observation.
Answer:
Prayer was a part of the life of the grandmother. All the time she had the rosary in her hand, her fingers kept rolling the beads and her lips kept muttering prayers. From morning till evening, whether she did her work or some work for the grandson, she did it with prayers. She went along with the grandson to the school, sat in the temple attached to the school reading scriptures till the school bell rang.

When the author grew up and went to the university, she spent her time spinning; yet all the time she had her prayers on her lips. When she fell ill also, she prayed – and prayed till her last breath. Thus, prayer was an integral part of the life of the grandmother.

Question 6.
‘She thumped the sagging skins of the dilapidated drum’. Has the description of the drum anything to do with the grandmother? Explain.
Answer:
The old grandmother became more and more secluded from the family bonds as the years passed. Perhaps this is part of the ageing process. She did not show any emotional changes when the grandson went abroad despite the fact that she had sensed her end. When her end actually neared, she gathered the neighbouring women and sang for the last time with them, playing the drums.

The ‘sagging skins’ and ‘dilapidated drum’ symbolize the old body of hers, the song ‘home-coming of the warrior’ indicates the return of the soul or death of mortal life. It also shows that even as the body sags, the soul sings and sings louder still.

 

Question 7.
Did the grandmother predict her death? How?
Answer:
The day the author returned from abroad, she sang and played drum singing about the warrior returning home. The next morning she was laid up with mild fever. Though the doctors said she would recover, she predicted that her end was near and it was because she did not chant any prayer.

So she decided to stop talking to others and only chant prayer. Until her end came, she did as she told others and passed away with the Lord’s name on her lips and the rosary beads in her hand.

Question 8.
How did the sparrows react to her earlier in her life and later after her death?
Answer:
Whenever the grandmother sat in the verandah breaking the bread into little bits, hundreds of little birds collected round her creating a veritable bedlam of chirping. After her death, thousands of sparrows sat scattered on the floor. There was no chirping. The sparrows took no notice of the bread crumbs put by others. When grandmother’s corpse was carried off, they flew away quietly.

Question 9.
What picture of the grandmother do you get from the lesson?
Answer:
From the lesson, it is very evident that the grandmother was a very active woman till her demise. In the village, she took care of the author and even dropped and picked him up from the school. In the city when going out was not an option, she spent the whole day at the wheel, spinning and feeding spanous.

We also realize that she was a very devout lady. She always had a prayer in her lips. She used to speak less, pray more. Grandmother had a special affinity to animals and birds. Size used to feed stray dogs in the village and once she settled in the city, she used to feed the sparrows.
She was very much attached to the author.

They used to have lengthy conversations in the village and after coming to city’, when the conversations got reduced and finally stopped, she became very much withdrawn but never blamed her grandson at all. From the story, the picture one gets of the grandmother is of a physically frail woman but mentally a very strong woman.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
What was an inseparable part of the grandmother?
Answer:
The rosary and her prayers were an inseparable part of the grandmother.

Question 2.
Why did the grandmother say her morning prayer in a monotonous sing-song?
Answer:
She hoped that the author would listen and get to know it by heart.

Question 3.
What did the writer have for breakfast in his school days?
Answer:
Thick, stale chapattis with a little butter and sugar spread on it.

Question 4.
Why did the grandmother always accompany the author to his school?
Answer:
The school was attached to the temple. The priest taught the alphabet and the morning prayer. When the school went on, the grandmother sat inside the temple reading the scriptures.

Question 5.
How is the grandfather described by the writer?
Answer:
Khushwant Singh describes his grandfather as he was painted in the portrait that was hung above the mantlepiece. He wore a big turban and loose-fitting clothes. He had a long white beard and he looked at least 100 years old. He looked like the kind of person who could have only lots and lots of grandchildren.

 

Question 6.
Why did the writer listen to his grandmother’s prayers while he was young?
Answer:
The author’s grandmother used to say her prayers aloud as she got him ready to go to school. She hoped that
he would listen and get to know them by heart. He never paid attention to her prayers. He only listened to her voice because he loved it.

Question 7.
What did the grandmother do with the stale chapattis that she carried to the school?
Answer:
Those chapattis were used to feed the village dogs, which followed them from the temple door.

Question 8.
What was the turning point in the writer’s friendship with his grandmother?
Answer:
The grandmother and the writer fully enjoyed each other’s company as long as they lived by themselves. After some time, his parents, who had comfortably settled in the city, sent for them. Their moving to the city was the turning point. She could no longer accompany him to school nor help him with his studies.

Question 9.
Why did the grandmother not like the writer’s city school?
Answer:
In the city the writer started going to an English school in a motor bus. He learnt English and things of western science there. She could not understand them. It made her unhappy that she could not help him with his lessons. She also did not believe in the things they taught. They did not teach about God and the scriptures. This made her unhappy.

Question 10.
What reaction did the writer expect from his grandmother when he was going abroad?
Answer:
He thought that his grandmother would be upset about his decision to go abroad. At her age, he was not sure what would happen, as he was going away for five years. When she kissed him good-bye on his forehead, he thought that perhaps it was the last sign of physical contact between them.

Question 11.
How did the grandmother react when their common link of friendship was snapped?
Answer:
The writer and the grandmother were separated when he went to university, because he was given a room of his own. Earlier, he shared one with his grandmother. She accepted her seclusion with resignation. She rarely left her spinning wheel to talk to anyone. From sunrise to sunset she sat by her wheel spinning and reciting prayers.

 

Question 12.
Why did the narrator think that the grandmother’s kiss was the last sign of physical contact between them?
Answer:
The grandmother kissed the forehead of the narrator before he left for abroad. The narrator considered it the last sign of physical contact. He might not see her again. He did not expect his old grandmother to live for five more years. She was a terribly old lady.

Question 13.
Which was the “happiest half-hour of the day” for the grandmother?
Answer:
For Kushwanth Singh’s grandmother, there was no other pastime and happier activity than that of feeding the sparrows in the afternoon for half an hour. The sparrows could be seen perched on her but were never shooed away by her.

Question 14.
What did the priest teach at the village school?
Answer:
The priest taught the alphabet and the morning prayer at the village school. He made the students stand in rows on either side. They would sing the alphabet and the morning prayer in a chorus.

Question 15.
Draw a comparison between the village school and the English school in the city.
Answer:
The village school was quite simple and small. It was attached to a temple. The priest himself acted as the teacher. He taught the alphabet and the morning prayer at the school. In comparison, the English school in the city provided a contrast. They gave instructions in English and taught modem science and music. They didn’t teach anything about God and the scriptures at the English school.

Question 16.
Why did the grandmother hate music?
Answer:
The grandmother actually hated music. She was a conservative old lady who had her own beliefs and superstitions. She thought that music was meant only for prostitutes and beggars. It was not meant for gentlefolk. Music was not meant for school children from respectable families.

 

Question 17.
How did the sparrows mourn the death of the grandmother?
Answer:
The sparrows also joined in mourning the death of the grandmother. They sat in thousands around her dead body. They didn’t chirrup. Nor did they touch the combs of bread thrown to them. They flew away quietly when the dead body was carried off for cremation.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
The author had known his grandmother for
A) ten years
B) twenty years
C) five years
D) forty years.
Answer:
B) twenty years

Question 2.
In the portrait, the author’s grandfather looked
A) eighty years old
B) ninety years old
C) at least a hundred years old
D) fifty years old.
Answer:
C) at least a hundred years old

Question 3.
The author’s parents left him with his grandmother when
A) they went to a foreign country
B) they went to live in the city
C) the author did not want to go with them
D) the grandmother told them to leave him there.
Answer:
B) they went to live in the city

 

Question 4.
The author’s grandmother went to school with him
A) so that she could also learn
B) to be with him constantly
C) to read scriptures in the temple
D) to teach in the school.
Answer:
C) to read scriptures in the temple

Question 5.
The turning point in the relationship between the author and the grandmother came when
A) they went to live in the city
B) they were living in the village
C) the author went abroad
D) the author went to the university.
Answer:
A) they went to live in the city

Question 6.
The grandmother was unhappy because
A) the author went to school in a bus
B) the author did not talk to her
C) the author went to a local school
D) they did not teach about God and the scriptures in the English school.
Answer:
D) they did not teach about God and the scriptures in the English school.

Question 7.
On the day before her death, the author’s grandmother
A) sat in a comer and said her prayers
B) beat an old dmm and sang songs
C) talked to the members of the family
D) slept in her room soundly.
Answer:
B) beat an old dmm and sang songs

Question 8.
We know that the author’s grandmother had a premonition of her death because
A) the doctor said her fever would not go away
B) she dreamt about her death
C) she went on feeding the sparrows
D) she told them her end was near.
Answer:
D) she told them her end was near.

 

Question 9.
The portrait which hung above the mantlepiece was that of the
A) grandmother
B) great grand uncle
C) grandfather
D) great grandfather
Answer:
C) grandfather

Question 10.
The author was given a room of his own when
A) he went to high school
B) he went to university
C) he went abroad
D) he went back to the village
Answer:
B) he went to university

Language Activities:

A. Vocabulary:

V1. In the lesson, the word ‘tell’ has been used in different contexts to mean differently. Now match the usage of the word ‘tell’ with its meaning as used in the lesson. The use of the word “tell”:

The word Its meaning
1. Her fingers were busy telling the beads of her rosary a. Be sure
2. I would tell her English words b. Give information to somebody
3. She told us that her end was near c. Making something known to someone in spoken or written words
4. At her age, no one could tell d. Counting while reacting
Answer:

d
c
b
a
B. Grammar And Usage:

G1. a) Fill in the blanks with the past perfect form of the verbs given in brackets:

I …………. (fail) to catch the train on that fateful day. If I ……….. (come) five minutes earlier, I ………… (tell) myself that I would never be late again.
Answer:
I had failed to catch the train on that fateful day. If I had come five minutes earlier, I had told myself that I would never be late again.

b) Pick out five more sentences from the lesson having the verbs in past perfect form.

She had always been short and fat and slightly bent.
She had always been as we had known her.
Old, so terribly old that she would not have grown older and had stayed at the same age for 20 years.
She would fetch my wooden slate which she had already washed.
……….. she would ask me what the teacher had taught me.
The setting sun had lit her room with a blaze of golden light.
c) Fill in the blanks using the past perfect form of the verbs given in brackets:

When I reached the station, the train ………… (leave) already.
By the time the teacher entered the class, the students …………. (stop) talking.
I would have failed, if I ………….. not (work) hard.
If I …………. (walk) fast, I would have won the race.
Answer:

had left,
had stopped,
had, worked,
had walked.
G2. Prepositions:

Ex. 1 Here is a page from Renu’s diary. It talks about what Renu did in a week in August 2011. Read carefully and complete the following:

First one is done for you.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 3 The Potrait of a lady 1
Eg. Renu went to a movie on Saturday evening.

She telephoned Reema
She did not do anything special
She pressed her clothes
She went to the library
She went to the music class
Answer:

on Thursday,
on Monday,
on Sunday,
on Wednesday evening,
on Tuesday at 5-30.
Ex. 2

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 3 The Potrait of a lady 2
Where are the people in the picture? Complete the sentences. The first one is done for you.
Eg. Chandru is standing behind Farooq.

Farooq is sitting …………… Esha.
Esha is sitting …………. Devi and Farooq.
Devi is sitting to …………. Esha.
Farooq is sitting …………… Chandru.
Esha is sitting ………….. Bhama.
Arun is standing …………….. Devi.
Bhama is standing ………….. Arun and Chandru.
Answer:

beside,
between,
next,
in front of,
in front of,
behind,
between.

Ex. 3 Mr. Feter asks you how to go to the park from the church. Now direct him using the picture clues. Write the sentences in the blanks given.

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 3 The Potrait of a lady 3
Now, rewrite the above-framed sentences using bubbles as given here.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 3 The Potrait of a lady 4
Answer:
Excuse me, where is the park?
Go past the church. Go under the bridge. Go up the hill. Get down the steps. Go by the street. Go beyond the hotel. Walk across the bridge. You will arrive at the park.

Ex. 4. Read the information and complete the sentences:

(Sandeep/Tuinakuni/2000-2007) Sandeep lived in Tumakuru from 2000 to 2007.

(Sandeep/Tumakurit/2007) Sandeep lived in Tumakuru ………. 2007.
(Sandeep/Bengaluru/2007-) Sandeep has lived in Bengaluru …………. 2007.
Answer:

Sandeep lived in Tumakuru until 2007.
Sandeep has lived in Bengaluru since 2007.
Ex. 5. Fill in the blanks using ‘until / since / for’:

I was tired this morning. I stayed in bed …………. 10 o’clock.
We waited for Usha ………… half an hour, but she did not come.
“Have you just arrived? No, I have been here ………….. half past seven”.
“How long did you stay in the office yesterday?” ” ………… 8 p.m.”
Don’t open the door of the train …………. the train stops.
This is my house. I have lived here …………… I was seven years old.
Sumana has gone away. She will be away ………….. Wednesday.
Next week I am going to Delhi ……….. three days.
I usually finish work at 5-30, but sometimes I work ………….. six.
“How long have you known Harshitha?” ……….. we were at school together.
Shwetha and I are good friends. We have known each other …………. ten years.
“I am tired. I am going to lie down …………. a few minutes”
Answer:

until
for
since
Until
until
since
until
for
until
Since
for
for
G3. Question forms:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 3 The Potrait of a lady 5
A. Frame questions to get the underlined words as the answers:

We have our annual exams during summer.
When do you have your annual exams?
Mr. Rao and his family went to Andaman during the vacation.
Where did Mr. Rao and his family go during the vacation?
Sorry, I am late because of heavy traffic.
Why are you late?
My friend walks to school.
How does your friend go to school?
Sheetal had toasted bread for breakfast.
What did Sheetal have for breakfast?
The Indian Ambassador visited the Western countries.
Who visited the Western countries?
This is our school’s property.
Whose property is this?
The doctor talked to the patient yesterday.
Whom did the doctor talk to yesterday?
Masala dosa is my favorite dish.
Which is your favorite dish?
The red-colored bag is mine.
Which bag is yours?

B. Yes/No questions:

Eg.
Question 1.
Was the grandmother happy with the company of sparrows?
Answer:
Yes, she was.

Question 2.
Did you complete your homework?
Answer:
Yes, I did. OR No, I didn’t.

Question 3.
Shall we go now?
Answer:
Yes, we shall. OR No, we shall not.
The above questions begin with auxiliary verbs. They are answered either with ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.

Now answer these questions with ‘Yes’ or ‘No’:

Question 1.
Do you like mangoes?
Answer:
Yes, I do. OR No, I don’t.

Question 2.
Has the doctor arrived?
Answer:
Yes, he has. OR No, he hasn’t.

Question 3.
Is the train running on time?
Answer:
Yes, it is. OR No, it isn’t.

Question 4.
Can Rani swim?
Answer:
Yes, she can. OR No, she can’t.

Question 5.
Will your mother accompany us?
Answer:
Yes, she will. OR No, she won’t.

C. Question Tags:

Read the following examples :

We all love ice-cream, don’t we?
She cannot drive, can she?
He is tall, isn’t he?
You have a car, don’t you?
She has visited the place, hasn’t she?
They will be here tomorrow, won’t they?
You are good, aren’t you?
They are not going to school today, are they?

Add question tags to the statements below:

It is a beautiful day, ………………….
You have been to Paris, ……………….
The film wasn’t very good, ……………….
Anu lives near your house, ……………….
You don’t know French, ……………….
The policeman directs the traffic, ………………
Some species are getting extinct on earth day-by-day, ……………….
He has a Benz car, ………………
We should not tell lies, ………………..
Indians love peace, ……………….
Answer:

isn’t it?
haven’t you?
was it?
doesn’t she?
do you?
doesn’t he?
aren’t they?
hasn’t he?
should we?
don’t they?
The Portrait of a lady by Khushwant Singh About The Author:

This prose piece is written by Khushwant Singh, one of the well known Indian novelists and journalists. He is better known for his writings in the “Illustrated Weekly of India”. Secularism and humor are a prominent part of his writing. He was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1974 and the Padma Vibhushan in 2007. His works include ‘A History of the Sikhs’, ‘Train to Pakistan’ and ‘Delhi’.

In this essay, he makes a vivid character-sketch of his grandmother, who was a pious lady and led a devout life. The only time she seems to have given up praying was when she sang with ecstasy on the arrival of her grandson from abroad after completing his education. It is a very touching story too.

The Portrait of a lady Summary in English
In this story, Khushwant Singh draws a pen picture of his grandmother. He describes how he had spent his childhood with her in the village. He also describes the change that came in the relationship in the city. Ultimately, he describes the moving scene of her death.

Khushwant Singh draws here an interesting portrait of his grandmother. He presents her as a tender, loving and deeply religious old lady. Singh says that his grandmother was an old woman. Her face was so wrinkled that it was difficult to believe that she had ever been young and pretty. Her hair was white as snow. She had a little stoop in her back. She could be seen reciting her rosary all the time. A picture of the author’s grandfather was hung on the wall. He appeared old too and it was difficult to believe that he ever had a wife.

He appeared to have only lots and lots of grandchildren. Singh was the only child at that time. His parents had gone to live in the city leaving him behind in the village under the care of his grandmother. She would get him ready for school, and would also feed him with chapattis. The school was attached to a temple. All the children sat in the verandah reciting the alphabet while his grandmother was engaged in reading the holy scriptures.

Finally, in the evening, the author and the grandmother would walk back home feeding the dogs on the way.

After a friendly relationship with his grandmother, he had to adapt to a new life in the city. This was a turning point for the grandmother and the grandson. Both of them were sent to settle down in the city with his parents. The author went to an English school but the grandmother never liked the way he was taught. Though Singh and his grandmother shared the same room, she was unable to help him. Apart from this, she was also disappointed that he was learning music that she considered inappropriate for gentle folks.

In due course, when Singh went up to University he was given a separate room. This indeed made the common link of their relationship snap completely. The grandmother accepted the fact, and she would spin the wheel from sunrise to sunset to compensate that. Only during the afternoons, she would relax by feeding the sparrows with little pieces of bread. They were her best friends and the sparrows also liked her company.

Later, Singh went abroad for higher studies for five long years. He had a doubt in his mind whether his grandmother would survive or not until he came back. He also thought that it might be the last physical contact between them when she came to the railway station to see him off. However, after five years, when he came back, incredibly he was welcomed by his grandmother who seemed had not grown older by a single day. Singh noticed that even at that time when everyone was joyful about his return, grandmother’s happiest moments were with her sparrows.

Later in the evening, there was a change in her attitude. She celebrated the return of her grandson by collecting some women of the neighborhood and beating the drum for several hours. But, in the morning, grandmother’s health deteriorated and she revealed that she was nearing her end. So she decided that she was not going to waste a single moment by talking. So she prayed. Quite suddenly, the rosary fell from her hand and she exhaled her last breath and it was clear that she was no more.

After making the preparations for the funeral, the family members went to fetch her body for the last journey. The golden blaze of light of the setting sun glittered in her room. And to pay their last homage to the grandmother, thousands of sparrows gathered in and around her room. The sparrows never did chirrup nor did they bother to notice the bread pieces thrown at them. When the grandmother’s corpse was carried off, the sparrows flew away quietly.

 

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Glossary:

puckered (adj): tightly gathered or contracted into wrinkles or small folds
serenity (n): the state of being calm, peaceful and untroubled
monotonous (adj): dull, tedious and repetitious, lacking in variety and interest, (monotonously – adv)
veritable (adj): used for emphasis, often to qualify a metaphor
bedlam (n): a scene of uproar and confusion
rebuke (v): express sharp disapproval or criticism (of someone) because of their behavior or actions (rebuke is also a noun)
pallor (n): an unhealthy pale appearance
turning point (n): a time at which a decisive change in a situation occurs, especially one with beneficial results
frivolous: not having any serious purpose or value.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

 

On Saying Please

On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

 

C1. Answer the following in a word, a phrase, or a sentence each:

Question 1.
Why was the passenger thrown out of the lift?
Answer:
The passenger was thrown out of the lift for being impolite. He did not say “Top please” but just said “Top”.

Question 2.
What would happen if we were given the liberty to box people’s ears?
Answer:
If we were given the liberty to box people’s ears, violence would be let loose.

 

Question 3.
What can the law not compel us to do?
Answer:
The law cannot compel us to say ‘please’ or to attune our voice to other people’s sensibilities.

Question 4.
What, according to the author, is the difference between physical pain and pain of the wound caused to one’s self-respect?
Answer:
We always think of physical pain when we talk about pain. But the wound is deeper and the scar darker when self-respect is damaged. The physical pain passes away soon but the pain of a wound to our self-respect or our vanity may poison a whole day.

Question 5.
What is the first and the most important requirement of civility?
Answer:
The first requirement of civility is that we should acknowledge a service.

Question 6.
What did the ‘polite conductor’ do for the author?
Answer:
When the author boarded a bus and found that he was utterly penniless, he told the conductor that he would go back. The conductor said that it was all right and issued him a ticket cheerfully. When the author wondered as to when to repay the amount, the conductor assured him that the author was likely to find him again sometime.

Question 7.
Who had trampled on the author’s sensitive toe?
Answer:
The same conductor, who had earlier helped him with the ticket, trampled on the author’s sensitive toe.

Question 8.
The polite conductor ………………..
a) left the blind man at the bus exit
b) told Bill to take him across the road
c) told Bill, the driver, to wait and took him, himself, across the road
d) forced him out of the bus.
Answer:
(c) Told Bill, the driver, to wait and took him, himself, across the road.

Question 9.
Why was there very fine weather on the polite conductor’s bus always?
Answer:
It is people who bring about a change in the surroundings. There was always very fine weather on the polite conductor’s bus because of his own civility, polite speech and good humour which infected his passengers.

 

Question 10.
What, according to the people, is the cause for the dampening of the everyday civilities?
Answer:
Where there is pride, there is conflict. The everyday civilities diminish or dampen due to the clash of egos among people. The harmonious atmosphere is spoiled by the rudeness” of an egoist person.

Question 11.
Civilities can be got back in our day-to-day life by ………………
a) evoking the law
b) being more civil
c) paying rudeness with rudeness
d) by punishing an uncivil person.
Answer:
(b) being more civil.

C2. Discuss the following questions in a group and answer:

Question 1.
Can law enforce civility? Why?
Answer:
No, law cannot enforce civility. Unfortunately, law can be enforced only in specific instances of violation of human rights as spelt out in our Constitution. The law can be enforced only when there is physical violence. But the law cannot enforce or compel one to say ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ which would come under etiquette and not rule. The law does not consider the hurting of our feelings as a case for compensation. The law does not have any compensation for moral and intellectual damage. The law cannot become the guardian of our private manners.

Question 2.
How does bad temper affect one’s life?
Answer:
Bad temper harms not only the person who exhibits it, but also all those who come in contact with him. Bad manners are infectious. Bad manners do more to poison the stream of the general life than all the crimes in the calendar. When a man gets insulted by someone, he passes it on to someone else below his social standing, and in the same manner, it keeps passing from one to another and the world gets infected with ill-humors.

Question 3.
Discuss the importance and effect of good manners.
Answer:
It is not an exaggeration to say that manners make man. Good manners are also as infectious as bad manners. Just like the sunny weather that brightens up people’s spirits, good behaviour also brightens up the day. If we are civil, humorous towards others, we will get the same response from others.

That is why the theme of the essay revolves around the issue of manners and while we might be frustrated with the rudeness around us, individuals can counter it with demonstrating good manners to one another and brightening one another’s day.

 

Question 4.
List out the instances in which the polite conductor showed his civil behaviour. Do you approve of his behaviour? Why?
Answer:
The author makes use of the character of the conductor to highlight the point that it is possible for every one of us to be polite on a daily basis without losing anything. Once when the author had forgotten his wallet and got into the bus, the conductor instead of asking him to get down, gave him the ticket asking him to pay the next time. Another day, the author’s toe was trampled on by the conductor. But the conductor apologized so sweetly, sincerely and repeatedly that the author willingly forgave him.

The author noticed that the conductor was very helpful to both the old and the young alike. The author greatly appreciated the conductor’s behaviour towards a blind man. The conductor told the driver Bill to wait and took the blind man himself across the road. His behaviour made everyone cheerful and his gaiety was not a wasteful luxury but a sound investment.

Question 5.
How could the lift-matt take polite and effective revenge? Suggest a way to do so.
Answer:
Good manners are of great value in human life. Bad manners are not a legal crime. But everybody dislikes a man with bad manners. Small courtesies win us a lot of friends. The law does not permit us to hit back if we are the victims of bad manners. But if we are threatened with physical violence, the law permits us some liberty of action. Bad manners create a chain reaction. Social practice demands politeness from us. A well-mannered person will find that his work becomes easier by the ready co-operation that he gets from others.

That is why reacting to bad manners with bad manners would not be a solution. The lift-man could have taken polite and effective revenge instead of getting upset and sending the man out of the lift. If he had treated the gentleman who was not civil, with elaborate politeness, he would have had the victory not only over the rude man but over himself and that is the victory that counts.

C3. Answer the following:

Question 1.
It is easy to be civil at all times. Do you agree? Why?
Answer:
Civility is at once easy and difficult. On the one hand, it is easy because it is something that is within our control. On the other, it is difficult because if people with whom we associate are not civil, it is difficult to continue to be polite with them.. Civility is also difficult because, in life we interact with people belonging to different backgrounds, cultures and positions. What is perceived as rudeness by one might be the natural behaviour of another? That is why the best yardstick of civility would be to behave in such a way that our behaviour does not hurt others. Our behaviour should be such that it spreads joy around us.

Question 2.
If you are asked to recall a day in your life, you would perhaps remember both the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’ on that day. What do you think makes you recall both the good and the bad? Describe the people who you think were responsible for the same.
Answer:
It is when we are on travel that we come across strangers who turn out to be either good or bad. It was when we went to a world famous museum that I had left my mobile in the washroom. The lady, who went to the washroom after me, came out running, looking for me and returned the set. I will never forget the good deed of this stranger who was more than a friend at that moment.

On the same day, as the lift in a station was not working, I had a real tough time with my heavy luggage. Many young boys and girls passed by me without even looking in my direction. However, after I had climbed halfway through, an elderly gentleman offered help restoring my faith in humanity.

 

Question 3.
Suggest some ways to encourage people to adopt civil behaviour.
Answer:
a) The easiest way to adopt civil behaviour is to get into the Christian spirit of saying, ‘Do unto others what you want others to do unto you’
b) A smile costs nothing. With a smile we can turn strangers into friends.
c) Small helpful gestures like helping someone who is struggling with heavy luggage, moving a little bit to accommodate a fellow passenger in the bus, exchanging the lower berth for an upper berth to help an elderly person in the train are all small gestures which will make life comfortable for others and worthwhile for us.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
What did the lift-man expect the passenger to say?
Answer:
“Top-please” instead of just “Top”.

Question 2.
When would the law protect a person?
Answer:
If a burglar breaks into a house and the inmate knocks down the burglar, the law protects the householder. If the householder is physically assaulted, it will permit him to retaliate with reasonable violence.

Question 3.
What penalty would a haughty or boorish person have to pay if he is uncivil?
Answer:
The only penalty he will have to pay is being written down as an ill-mannered fellow.

Question 4.
Why does the writer feel that the lift-man was more acutely hurt by the passenger in this particular case?
Answer:
In the said case, the lift-man probably felt that the passenger’s behaviour was a slur upon his social standing. Therefore, he felt the pain more acutely than if he were kicked or had been physically assaulted.

Question 5.
What, according to the writer, was probably the reason for the passenger’s discourtesy to the lift-man?
Answer:
The writer guesses that perhaps the passenger was hurt by his employer, who had not wished him good morning. The employer may have been henpecked by his wife to whom the cook had been insolent. The cook was angry perhaps because the housemaid was rude. So, there probably was a chain reaction which ended up with the lift-man being hurt.

 

Question 6.
Why would people sympathise with the lift-man in spite of his anger?
Answer:
To be civil to others is a social practice. Though there is no law which compels us to say ‘please’ or ‘thank you’, there is a social practice which is more sacred than any law which expects us to be civil and to acknowledge a service. In the case of the lift¬man, the passenger was being uncivil and rude to him. So, most people would sympathise with the lift-man.

Question 7.
How do the ‘little courtesies’ help us in our daily life?
Answer:
Words like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ are the little courtesies which we use in order to acknowledge a service. These little courtesies go a long way because they are the small change with which we pay our way as social beings. These little courtesies keep our machine of life oiled sweetly. They put our relationship with others upon the basis of friendly co-operation and easy give- and-take, instead of on the basis of superiors dictating to inferiors.

Question 8.
What kind of mind would wish to command?
Answer:
A vulgar mind.

Question 9.
Why do some bus conductors use a loud voice and an aggressive manner?
Answer:
There are some unpleasant bus conductors who regard the passengers as their natural enemies – as creatures whose purpose on the bus is to cheat him and who can be kept reasonably honest only by a loud voice and aggressive manner.

Question 10.
Why did the writer say that his toe was not hurt, though it was hurt?
Answer:
The person who trampled on his toe was none other than the polite bus conductor. He had done so unawares. After that he was very apologetic too. He was so nice that the writer could only assure him that he was not hurt.

Question 11.
How did the polite bus conductor make his passengers comfortable?
Answer:
The polite bus conductor had a fund of patience and he had a gift for making his passengers comfortable. He did several things to make their travel pleasant and comfortable. For e.g., if it was raining, he would run up to call the passengers inside the bus; with old people he was as considerate as a son and with children he was as concerned as a father. He radiated warmth towards youngsters and made them happy with his jests.

He went out of the way to help the handicapped people. He would not only wait for an old man to get off, but also many a time, take a blind man across the road to make sure that he was safely on his way. Everybody on his bus found it a pleasant journey.

Question 12.
How could people sweeten the general atmosphere of behaviour?
Answer:
To sweeten the general atmosphere of behaviour we have to adopt civil behaviour. This is done by being kind and considerate to others. This cannot be done by invoking the law. Human society is, according to the writer, only a little lower than the angels. So, it is necessary to be civil.

 

Question 13.
What would be an effective way for the lift-man to take proper revenge? Why?
Answer:
The writer feels that the lift-man would have had a more subtle and effective revenge if he had treated the gentleman with elaborate politeness. Then, he would have had victory not only on the boorish gentleman but over himself, because a polite man may lose the material advantage but he would always have the spiritual victory.

Question 14.
How was spiritual victory achieved by Chesterfield?
Answer:
During Chesterfield’s time, who was a famous writer, the streets of London were without pavements. Pedestrians had a tough time walking on the road. Those who were closest to the wall had the driest footing. Once, a man who came from the opposite direction told Chesterfield that he never gave the wall to a scoundrel.

Chesterfield politely stepped aside saying that he always did. That was revenge enough, but done in a very apt yet a polite, civil manner. No doubt, in this case, the victory was Chesterfield’s.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
The lift-man insisted that the passenger should say
A) Please
B) Top-please
C) Top
D) Good morning.
Answer:
B) Top-please

Question 2.
No legal system in the world has attempted to legislate against
A) murder
B) assault
C) armed robbery
D) bad manners.
Answer:
D) bad manners.

Question 3.
…………… is not a legal offence.
A) Cheating
B) Smuggling
C) Discourtesy
D) Mugging.
Answer:
C) Discourtesy

Question 4.
If one is uncivil, haughty, boorish in this society, he/she will be called a/an
A) nice fellow
B) good mannered person
C) ill-mannered fellow
D) sophisticated person.
Answer:
C) ill-mannered fellow

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Question 5.
Civility is a ………….. which is older and more sacred than any law.
A) personal practice
B) group behaviour
C) social practice
D) foolish practice.
Answer:
C) social practice

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Question 6.
The first requirement of civility is that we should
A) not care for anything
B) not acknowledge anything
C) acknowledge a service
D) None of the above.
Answer:
C) acknowledge a service

Question 7.
The author had once left home without any money and boarded a bus. The conductor
A) ordered him to get off the bus
B) said it was all right and gave him the ticket
C) humiliated him in front of the passengers
D) gave him some money.
Answer:
B) said it was all right and gave him the ticket

Question 8.
The polite conductor bought heavy boots because he wanted to
A) escape from being trod on by people
B) cause discomfort to the people
C) tread on people’s feet
D) injure the author’s toe.
Answer:
A) escape from being trod on by people

Question 9.
The author says that a journey with the polite conductor was a lesson in
A) geography
B) learning the routes of the city
C) learning aggressive manners
D) natural courtesy and good manners.
Answer:
D) natural courtesy and good manners.

Question 10.
It was always fine weather on the polite conductor’s bus, because his civility, conciliatory address and good humoured bearing
A) infected his passengers
B) worsened the condition
C) made the weather condition light
D) spread confusion among the passengers.
Answer:
A) infected his passengers

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Question 11.
If bad manners are infectious, so are good manners. So, let us be
A) rude and make others rude
B) civil and make others civil
C) selfish and make others selfish
D) uncivil and make others uncivil.
Answer:
B) civil and make others civil

Question 12.
The passenger was thrown out of the
A) train
B) lift
C) bus
D) office.
Answer:
B) lift

Question 13.
The passenger wanted to go to the ……………. floor.
A) bottom
B) middle
C) top
D) ground
Answer:
C) top

Vocabulary:

V1. Following are some synonyms of the word ‘uncivil’. Rearrange the jumbled letters to get meaningful words:

uedr …………..
ouutnhc …………….
pdniutme …………..
cdosietuyrs ……………
tsolnnie …………….
gyhutah ……………
soomer …………….
robo ……………..
Answer:

rude
uncouth
impudent
discourtesy
insolent
haughty
morose
boor.
V2. Guess the words that could be used for a person with good manners. You can take the help of a thesaurus.

 

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Answer:

tolerant
kind
patient
solicitous
gallant
chivalrous
genteel
courteous.
Grammar And Usage:

G1. Identify the main clause and subordinate clause in the following sentences:

Because I like you, 1 shall help you.
This is the house that Jack built.
No one knows who he is.
It was unfortunate that you were absent.
He has a son who made a name for himself.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
1. I shall help you because I like you
2. This is the house that Jack built
3. No one knows who he is
4. It was unfortunate that you were absent
5. He has a son who made a name for himself.
G2. Mark the main clause and subordinate clause and state the type of subordinate clause.

The workers, who were weary, lay down to rest.
The exercise is so easy that I can do it.
He admitted that he wrote the letter.
The thief crept as a jackal does.
He has lost the book that his uncle gave him.
I remember the house where I was born.
Tell me why you did this.
When the righteous rule, the people rejoice.
He showed how the problem could be solved.
I hope that I shall be there in time.
We have come that we may help you.
The dog that bites does not bark.
Answer:
Main Clause Subordinate Pause Type of Pause
1. The workers lay down
to rest
2. The exercise is so easy
3. He admitted
4. The thief crept
5. He has lost the book
6. I remember the house
7. Tell me
8. The people rejoice
9. He showed
10. I hope
11. We have come
12. The dog does not bark Who were weary
that I can do it
that he wrote the letter
as a jackal does
that his uncle gave him
where I was born
why you did this
when the righteous rule
how the problem could be solved
that I shall be there in time
that we may help you
that bites Adjective
Adverb clause
Noun clause
Adverb clause
Adjective clause
Adverb clause
Norm clause
Adverb clause
Noun clause
Noun clause
Adverb clause
Adjective clause
Language Functions:

A) Speaking Activity:

S1. Read the following words aloud and identify the sounds of plural markers and list them.

maps, bags, books, phones, kites, hedges, fences, posters, ducks, fishes, bats, shirts, shoes, chalks, hooks, pens, grains, houses, bottles, benches, taxes, rooms, chains, matches.

/s/ /z/ /iz/
Maps, books, kites, ducks, bats, shirts, chalks, hooks Bags, phones, posters, shoes, pans, grains, bottles, rooms, chains Hedges, fences, fishes, houses, benches, taxes, matches

S2. The following conversation expresses a particular feeling. What has been expressed in the following dialogue?

Amit: This is a wonderful present you ‘ve got me. Thank you. Uncle: You’ re welcome.
Amit: You are very thoughtful and have picked up my favourite colour.
Uncle: I’m glad you like it and it has made you happy.
Amit: Oh! More than happy. Thank you, thank you very much.
The dialogue expresses gratitude.
S3. You are in the market carrying four heavy bags. An elderly person comes forward to help you. You accept the help. How would you express yourself to that person?

Stranger: Can I help you dear?
Yourself: ………………………..
Stranger: …………………………
Yourself: ……………………….
Stranger: I’ll keep your bags here, will that be ok?
Yourself: ………………………..
Answer:

Stranger: Can I help you dear?
Yourself: Very kind of you. Hope it’s not a problem for you.
Stranger: Not at all. Please give me the bags.
Yourself: You are a godsend. I wouldn’t have been able to manage all the bags.
Stranger: I’ll keep your bags here, will that be ok?
Yourself: Certainly. Thank you and may God bless you.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

B) Reading Skills:

Following are a few traffic signs. What do they indicate?
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 7 On Saying Please 2
Answer:

Hospital.
First-aid Post.
Eating Place.
No Entry.
Horn Prohibited.
No Parking.
School Ahead.
Narrow Bridge.
C) Writing Skills:

Write an essay on ‘Values in Indian culture’ in about 300 words.

Values in Indian Culture
India is a leader in the arena of culture for various reasons. It has to its credit a rich tradition making it culturally strong. More importantly, it has assimilated the cultural influences of the whole world and has shown that culture is not static; it is ever-growing. However, it has retained its own cultural values without being swept over by foreign influences. The essence of what we now have as Indian culture is the outcome of the Indian sentiment which is well-captured in the words of the Father of the Nation – Mahatma Gandhi:

“I do not want my house to be walled in on all sides
and my windows to be stuffed. I want the cultures of
all the lands to be blown about my house as freely as
possible. But I refuse to be blown off my feet by any.”

We remain entrenched in the values of our culture. Our biggest strength lies in our family bonds. Our children respect their elders, and the elders give them their unconditional love. The elders are not of the family alone. We have been taught right from our childhood the concept, ‘Matru devobhava, pitru devobhava, achaarya devobhava, athithi devobhava/ We respect our teachers and guests as much as we respect our parents. We are enjoined to see divinity in them.

We are also taught to respect wealth, but not rim after it. Wealth for us is Goddess Lakshmi, to be worshipped, not to be lusted after. That is why every auspicious occasion is marked by offerings to the poor and the priests.

But let us also remember that these values are quite often trampled upon by unscrupulous people who are cruel and selfish. That is why we the young should take the pledge to uphold all that is sacred in our culture and cleanse away the. impurities. Only then India can continue to be the torchbearer of values that can be emulated by all.

On Saying Please by A.G. Gardiner About The Author:

Alfred George Gardiner (1865-1946) was an English journalist and a writer. He was a prolific writer with a number of essays to his credit. His essays exhibit the very sensitive, highly cultured and sophisticated personality of the writer. He wrote under the pen name ‘Alpha of the Plough’.

On Saying Please Summary in English
‘On Saying Please’ is an essay that talks about socially important issues that we come across in our daily life. The essay shows how using polite words and phrases like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ can change the course of our day. Such words help us in making our passage through life smooth.

In his attempt to draw a distinction between what is etiquette and what is legally binding, Gardiner begins his essay with the example of a lift-man who threw a passenger out of the lift for not saying ‘please.’ While agreeing that courtesy is a desirable characteristic, Gardiner rightly points out that courtesy cannot be legally clamped upon people who are discourteous. The legal system, despite its shortcomings, is reasonable in not considering impoliteness an offence. Impoliteness is what is perceived as impolite and hence is subjective. Hence, punishment is not possible. At the most, we may brand the impolite person ill-mannered. But in the case of physical brutality the law gives us the right to self-defence.

The truth also remains that quite often impoliteness is more hurtful than physical abuse. What is worse, it has the cyclical effect. The one who is at the receiving end of rudeness from his superiors, takes it out on his subordinates as he cannot retaliate against his superiors. That is why we should know the importance and value of social practices that promote civility.

Gardiner offers the example of a good-natured conductor to show how such people can bring about positivity. Gardiner points out that the example of a genial conductor is not chosen under the assumption that conductors are by and large ill-tempered. Gardiner makes it clear that if here and there we have rude conductors, it is the outcome of their demanding job.

However, the friendly conductor made the author feel pleasantly surprised by buying a ticket for him as the author had forgotten his purse at home. Though the author later found a shilling in his pocket to pay the conductor, the cheerful behaviour of the conductor left him with a pleasant feeling.
On another occasion, it was the conductor who had trodden on the toe of the author. But he was so genuine in his apology that the author forgave him easily. It also became the habit of the author to notice the well-mannered conductor who took on different roles in helping his passengers. He was like a son to the old, father to the children, friend to the young and helper to the handicapped.

The author is especially impressed by the fact that the conductor would get out of the bus, asking the driver to wait for him so as to take the blind across the road or round the comer. Gardiner adds that just as good weather uplifts our spirit, good-natured people too bring about positivity. Their charm cannot be resisted by even unfriendly people.
Gardiner concludes the essay by observing that rudeness seemed to be the aftermath of war. He earnestly appeals to his readers to bring back civility to social behaviour.

Thus we see that the essay clearly shows the distinction between what is punishable by law and what is desirable though not punishable by law. While the law is very definite about how individuals should act, it does not have much to say about the issues of courtesy and kindness/politeness to others. The law speaks to individuals who have been wronged, whose rights have been taken away at the hands of another.

Yet, it cannot legislate manners or civility in acting towards one another. The reality is that while it is not a perfect state, this state of law is a reasonable one because it does not enter the realm of emotions. If the law gave in to this level of emotional subjectivity, then individuals would be carrying out acts of violence each time someone demonstrated rudeness to them. ’

Glossary:

comply: to obey a rule, or on order
discourtesy: not polite
acquit: to decide and state in a court of law that somebody is not guilty
assailant: an attacker
boorish: a rude, insensitive person
slur: a cause to blame
henpecked: a man who is always told by his wife
morose: very sad and ill-tempered
decalogue: The Ten Commandments
irradiated: to make something look brighter and happier
uncouth: a person of rude behavior
affront: insult
haughty: a high opinion of oneself and often a low position of others hurt feelings
laceration: a speech or piece of writing praising someone
panegyric: highly.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter On Saying Please.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

Mauritius

Mauritius

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius

Question 1.
Where is Mauritius?
Answer:
Mauritius is an island situated below the Equator on the Twentieth parallel, around 4,500 kms. south-west of Bombay.

Question 2.
Name the people of different origins found in Mauritius.
Answer:
Africans, Chinese, Biharis, Dutch, Persians, Tamils, Arabs, French, and English are the people of different origins found in Mauritius.

 

Question 3.
Who are referred to as the “buccaneering trinity” of those days? Why are they called so?
Answer:
The Dutch, the French and the English are referred to as the ‘buccaneering trinity’. In those days these three powers fought with one another continuously for possession of the island which had three advantages – spices and sugar, strategic position with regard to the maritime route and, advantageous position for piratical purposes.

Question 4.
List out some ‘very musical but unpronounceable names’ as found by the author.
Answer:
Trouaux Biches, Beau Bassin, Quarter Bomes, Curepipe, Ross Belle are some of the musical but unpronounceable names.

Question 5.
What are the ‘flora and fauna’ found in Mauritius?
Answer:
Centuries ago the bat was the only mammal before man went to Mauritius with monkeys and deer. In the present, the flora and fauna at Mauritius are typical of the place. The trees even in the interior of jungles are short and twisted, resembling overgrown bonsai.

The jungles have no wildlife at all. They don’t even have poisonous snakes and insects. Unfortunately, the number of birds is decreasing and dodo has gone extinct. Attempts are being made to preserve the Aldabra variety of giant tortoises as their number is also dwindling.

Question 6.
How is nature cruel to the people of Mauritius?
Answer:
Nature is cruel to the people of Mauritius because, in addition to the storms which are the annual feature of Mauritius, it devastates the island once in 15 years with the King cyclone as it did on February 6, 1975. The cyclone was a powerful 320 km. broad wind that moved in at 255 kms per hour. It ruined everything that came in its way for two days. However, people slowly forget the destruction and rebuild everything and also plant trees. But nature once again turns cruel and destroys everything with the King cyclone at the end of the 15-year period.

 

Question 7.
Name some aquatic creatures sighted by the author.
Answer:
Crabs, lobsters, fish coloured bright lemon yellow with black stripes, fishes with spikes all over their body, fish with long tails, fish with battered faces, shiny white blobs of sea creatures are sopie of the aquatic creatures sighted by the author.

C2. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
Why was it difficult for the author to locate Mauritius in his Atlas?
Answer:
It was very difficult for the author to locate Mauritius in his Allas because his atlas was a very old one and the weather, time and lots of cockroaches had made a lot of damage by putting dots. Therefore finding the small speck of Island in the vast Indian Ocean was very difficult.

Question 2.
What is the reason for the people of different countries to settle in Mauritius?
Answer:
Mauritius is inundated with sugarcane fields and spices which was the reason for the people’s different countries to settle here. Added to this was the strategic position of this Island on the maritime route to the East and it was conveniently placed for piratical purposes.

Question 3.
How does the author explain the absence of protocol among the government officials and ministers in Mauritius?
Answer:
The people of Mauritius are very friendly and relaxed towards everyone. The same atmosphere is found even in the seat of the Government. One can find the cabinet Ministers and others in high positions in an airport lounge or in a hotel lobby. They are unassuming, communicative, and accessible and move about without the shield of security people. In fact, the Prime Minister’s residence is a modest flat in a busy market street.

 

Question 4.
Give the description of mountains as given by the author.
Answer:
The author describes the peculiarity of the mountains of Mauritius by pointing out that the mountains do not have the – traditional pyramidal shape. Their outlines are unusual with straight drops and pin-pointed peaks that dangerously balance large boulders.

Question 5.
Describe how the people of Mauritius fight against the cruel jaws of nature.
Answer:
The people of Mauritius seem to be the ones with resilience. Even after going through the suffering of the total devastation caused by King cyclone, they have the interest to rebuild everything. They seem to forget the enormous violence of nature and plant trees in congested areas, build tall structures, fix plateglass picture windows and put up rooftops with an eye for elegance. The author is surprised and sad that they forget the destruction caused by the King cyclone which promptly hits the’ island once in 15 years.

Question 6.
What would be the future of Mauritius, as opined by the author?
Answer:
The writer seems to be despondent about the future of Mauritius. He states that present Mauritius is idyllic with no problems of population and unemployment. However, the country is worried about its whole economy is dependent on the single commodity of sugar and wants to welcome foreign entrepreneurship. But the writer knows that with the introduction of industries, the population would grow and flats would come up resulting in pollution and congestion.

This would also mean increased cost of living, taxation, unemployment, slums, and a whole lot of associated problems. With the growth in industries, infrastructure also will have to change. Roads will have to be widened. With wise planning, all these problems can be tackled. But whether the leaders have the vision to preserve paradise is a question for which the writer has no answer.

C3. Compare and contrast the arriving and departing experience of the author during his flight.

Question 1.
Does it suggest anything to you?
Answer:
While the author was on his way towards the Island of Mauritius, he was full of admiration for its physical features, pristine lands viewed through acres and acres of clouds and curious about its odd mixtures of race and language but with a sense of oneness. He was full of admiration its unpolluted beauty. But, on his return flight the thoughts were all of fear and anxiety about the future of the Island.

He thought that if the foreign entrepreneurs started their industries, the Island would become polluted, with shines, increase in cost of living, unemployment etc. He was exited and enthusiastic during his arrival and was depressed and worried during his departure.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
What was the condition of the world atlas which the writer had with him?
Answer:
It was old and it had many little dots and specks due to the passage of time, the weather and generations of cockroaches which had put them there.

 

Question 2.
How did the author perceive the ocean from the aircraft?
Answer:
From the aircraft, the ocean seemed to spread like a bluish-grey steel sheet.

Question 3.
What did the clouds resemble?
Answer:
The clouds seemed to resemble figures in the ancient legends of China, Rome, Greece and India.

Question 4.
What was far fetched, according to the writer?
Answer:
Drawing comparisons between what he observed from a height of 10,000 metres and what he learnt of Mauritius later seemed far fetched to the writer.

Question 5.
What was peculiar or rather special about Mauritius?
Answer:
Mauritius, though a tiny island, has an astonishing variety, strange juxtapositions, incongruities, odd mixtures of race and language. This is special about Mauritius.

Question 6.
Who ‘rub shoulders merrily’ in Mauritius as per the observations of the writer?
Answer:
Africans and Chinese, Biharis and Dutch, Persians and Tamils, Arabs, French and English – all rub shoulders merrily with one another in Mauritius.

 

Question 7.
Why did Radha Krishna Govindan surprise the writer?
Answer:
The writer thought that Radha Krishna Govindan was a Tamilian because he had a South Indian face and a name to go with it. But he responded in mangled English with a heavy French accent when spoken to. This surprised the writer.

Question 8.
Why were Radha Krishna Govindan’s ancestors brought to Mauritius?
Answer:
Centuries ago his ancestors were brought to the island of Mauritius as slaves or later as indentured labourers to work in sugarcane fields and factories or to cut timber in the jungle and haul it to the boats.

Question 9.
Who was the trinity referred to by the writer?
Answer:
The Dutch, the French, and the English.

Question 10.
Why did the trinity wage wars?
Answer:
The trinity battled for the possession of the islands for its spices and sugar and also for the strategic position of the islands on the maritime route to the East.

Question 11.
What is the attitude of the people of Mauritius towards strangers?
Answer:
The people of Mauritius are extremely relaxed and warm towards strangers. They always greet them with smiles as if one were a long lost friend.

Question 12.
Why was the writer ashamed?
Answer:
The writer was ashamed because being a city-bred man he could not even produce a warm smile. He had the pre-cast grim expression of a city-dweller and there was no warmth and spontaneity in his smile.

 

Question 13.
How are the cabinet ministers in Mauritius different from our own?
Answer:
The cabinet ministers in Mauritius do not behave as if they were born to grace the position they hold. They are unassuming, accessible,
communicative and above all, go about without a protective shield of security men.

Question 14.
Where was the residence of the Prime Minister of Mauritius situated?
Answer:
The Prime Minister’s residence was situated on a busy street lined with shops and crawling traffic. It was a modest-looking flat.

Question 15.
Whom does the writer remember when he sees Port Louis?
Answer:
Port Louis brings to the writer’s mind the memory of writers like Joseph Conrad and Somerset Maugham.3

Question 16.
How were the mountains in Mauritius formed?
Answer:
The blue mountains that ring the island of Mauritius are a volcanic happening of geological ages.

Question 17.
What is the area of Mauritius?
Answer:
The island of Mauritius is 64 km by 50 km in size.

 

Question 18.
What is the difference between the trees of the Andaman islands and those of Mauritius?
Answer:
The trees in the Andamans are gigantic. In Mauritius, however, they are short and gnarled even in interior jungles, looking like abnormally overgrown bonsai.

Question 19.
Name the flightless bird which was a native of Mauritius.
Answer:
Dodo.

Question 20.
Which are the water sports common in Mauritius?
Answer:
Scuba-diving, swimming, surf-riding, speed boat racing, yachting, and in some places horse-riding (in water).

Question 21.
What is the economy of Mauritius dependent upon?
Answer:
The economy of Mauritius is dependent upon sugar.

Question 22.
What is referred to as ‘paradise on earth’ by the writer?
Answer:
The island of Mauritius is referred to as paradise on earth by the writer.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
In the World Atlas, Mauritius looked like
A) a big island
B) a big city
C) a tiny speck
D) a continent.
Answer:
C) a tiny speck

 

Question 2.
The ancestors of the natives of Mauritius were brought to the island as slaves or labourers
A) to work in sugarcane fields
B) to work in factories
C) to cut timber in the jungle
D) All of the above.
Answer:
D) All of the above

Question 3.
The phrase ‘buccaneering trinity’ refers to
A) the Americans, the Dutch and the French
B) the French, the Russians and the English
C) the Polish, the Kiwis and the French
D) the Dutch, the French and the English.
Answer:
D) the Dutch, the French and the English.

Question 4.
The buccaneering trinity constantly fought for the possession of the island for
A) its spices
B) its sugar
C) the strategic position
D) All of the above.
Answer:
D) All of the above.

Question 5.
The battle of 1810 for the Island ended in favour of
A) the French
B) the Dutch
C) the English
D) the Americans.
Answer:
C) the English

Question 6.
In Mauritius
A) it is common to be greeted and smiled at
B) people are hostile
C) people do not mix with outsiders
D) people fight among themselves
Answer:
A) it is common to be greeted and smiled at

Question 7.
The Cabinet Ministers and others in high positions
A) live in ivory towers
B) are high handed
C) are like ordinary people
D) like to show their power.
Answer:
C) are like ordinary people

Question 8.
The Prime Minister of Mauritius lives in
A) a bungalow
B) a modest flat
C) a palace
D) White house.
Answer:
B) a modest flat

Question 9.
The trees in Mauritius are
A) gigantic in size
B) like bonsai specimen
C) short and gnarled
D) tall and abnormal.
Answer:
C) short and gnarled

Question 10.
The ……………… was a native of Mauritius.
A) Stork
B) Eagle
C) Dinosaur
D) Dodo
Answer:
D) Dodo

Question 11.
The cyclone that promptly appears and destroys Mauritius is the ………….. cyclone.
A) Trou aux Biches
B) King
C) Beau Bassin
D) Ross Belle
Answer:
B) King

 

Question 12.
The economy of Mauritius is dependent on
A) steel
B) sugar
C) natural gas
D) minerals.
Answer:
B) sugar

Language Activities:

Grammar And Usage:

G1. The order of adjectives:

When there are several adjectives to a noun, certain word order is followed. Here is the order:

Opinion
Size
Most other qualities
Age
Colour
Origin
Material
Type
Purpose
Ex. 1. Arrange the adjectives for the nouns provided, in the correct word order.

vase – glass, old, lovely
This is a lovely, old, glass vase.
(Most other qualities, age, material)
Basin – sugar, antique, silver
This is an antique, silver sugar basin.
(Age, material, type)
Game – family, new, exciting
This is an exciting, new family game.
(Opinion, age, type)
Computer – business, Japanese, powerful
This is a powerful, Japanese computer business.
(Most other qualities, origin, type)
Fire – electric, excellent, small
Excellent, small electric fire.
(Most other qualities, size, material)
Chocolate bar – new, big
Big, new chocolate bar.
(Size, age, material)
Comedy – American, television, terrific Terrific American television comedy.
(Most other qualities, origin, type)
Doors – aluminium, garage, stylish Stylish aluminium garage doors.
(Most other qualities, material, type)
Shoes – modem, sports, wonderful Wonderful, modem sports shoes.
(Most other qualities, age, purpose)
Phone – mobile, German, good Good German mobile phone.
(Most other qualities, origin, material)
Ex. 2. From the lesson, pick out the multiple adjectives used to describe the following:

Clouds like ……………….
Trees ……………….
Cabinet ministers …………………
Mountains do not have …………………
Lagoons ………………
Answer:

Clouds like – funny shapes, odd, abstract.
Trees – short and gnarled, abnormally overgrown.
Cabinet ministers – ordinary, unassuming, accessible, communicative.
Mountains do not have – traditional, monotonous, pyramidal shapes.
Lagoons – calm, turquoise blue.
G2. Modals:

A. Given below are some dialogues. Underline the modals.

a) A: Raju has fractured his arm.
B: But still he can write.
b) A: I have still some shopping to do. May I leave my bag in your store?
B: Yes, but please collect it before 8-00 p.m.
c) A: The coffee is rather bitter. Would you please pass some sugar?
B: No, you must not take any sugar.
d) A: My feet get swollen in the evening.
B: Then you must consult a doctor.
e) A: I’ll not be able to finish my assignment in time.
B: Shall I do the drawings for you?

B. Match the modals in bold in column A with their corresponding functions and attitude given in column B.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 4 Mauritius 3
Answer:

g
c
e
a
h
f
b
d

C. Read the following letter and choose the most suitable alternative from those given in brackets. Underline your choice. Sometimes more than one alternative is suitable.

Dear Mohit

It was pleasing to get your letter and to hear the good news that you are going trekking with your friends. You (ought to / would / should) have a break after your exams! You asked me what you (can / should / will) take. Well, you (might / can’t / mustn’t) fit everything in a backpack so you must be selective. You (will /can/must) take at least one sweater because it (ought to / should / can) get very cold in the mountains. You (needn’t / could / should) pack a gas stove because there (could / may / will) be plenty of firewood from dead trees.

I am sure you (will / should / could) have a wonderful time but I (may / would / should) give you a word of warning. Don’t get stuck in the Laki Pass at night. Once you’re there you (won’t be able to / can’t be able to / not be able to) get down and it’s very dangerous at night. By the way, you (should / should have to / should have) told me earlier that you were going and I (should have / would have / will have) given you walking boots!

Anyway, look after yourself and enjoy your holiday.

With love
Daddy
Answer:
Dear Mohit

It was pleasing to get your letter and to hear the good news that you are going trekking with your friends. You should have a break after your exams! You asked me what you can take. Well. you can’t fit everything in a backpack so you must be selective. You must take at least one sweater because it can get very cold in the mountains. You needn’t pack a gas stove because there will be plenty of firewood from dead trees.

I am sure you will have a wonderful time but I would give you a word of warning. Don’t get stuck in the Laki Pass at night. Once you’re there you won’t be able to get down and it’s very dangerous at night. By the way, you should have told me earlier that you were going and I would have given you walking boots!

Anyway, look after yourself and enjoy your holiday.

With love
Daddy

Ex.4.
Sara does not understand a concept her teacher has just taught. Complete the dialogue given below using appropriate models.

Sara: Excuse me, Madam, …………… you repeat the explanation again, please?
Teacher: Why do you want me to repeat it? You ……………. be very attentive when I am teaching.
Sara: Sorry madam, I ………….. hear you properly.
Teacher: You ……………. have a hearing problem Sara, get your ears checked. You ……………. sit in the front row from tomorrow. I ………….. now explain it again. Pay attention.
Sara: Thank you, madam.
Answer:

Sara: Excuse me, Madam, could you repeat the explanation again, please?
Teacher: Why do you want me to repeat it? You should be very attentive when I am teaching.
Sara: Sorry madam, I couldn’t hear you properly.
Teacher: You may have a hearing problem Sara, get your ears checked. You must sit in the front row from tomorrow. I will now explain it again. Pay attention.
Sara: Thank you, madam.
Language Skills:

L1. Read the situations given in Column A and complete the likely responses to them in Column B.

Situation Likely Response
1) Your neighbor is playing loud
music, which is disturbing you. Can you please………………….
2) You could not visit your friend who was ill at the hospital. I am sorry……………………..
3) You have lost the book you had borrowed from your friend. I am Extremely sorry………………….
4) You are late to school by an hour. Excuse me Madam, I am …………………..
5) You are unable to help your friend financially in his need. I am afraid I cannot ……………………
Answer:

1) Your neighbor is playing loud music, which is disturbing you. Can you please turn down the volume?
2) You could not visit your friend who was ill at the hospital. I am sorry that I couldn’t visit you at the hospital.
3) You have lost the book you had borrowed from your friend. I am extremely sorry that I have misplaced the book that I borrowed from you.
4) You are late to school by an hour. Excuse me, Madam. I am sorry that I am late by an hour.
5) You are unable to help your friend financially in his need. I am afraid I cannot be of help to you. OR
I am afraid I cannot help you financially.
L2. Listening and speaking:

Ex. 1. Classify into two groups according to the /i:/ and /e/ sounds:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 4 Mauritius 1
Answer:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 4 Mauritius 2

 

Ex. 2. Change the vowel sound from /e/ to /i:/ in these words and write the new words.

check
red
bet
men
sell
sweat
bed
set
fed
led
Answer:

check cheek
red read
bet beat
men mean
sell seal
sweat sweet
bed bead
set seat
fed feed
led lead.
Mauritius by R.K.Laxman About The Author:

R.K. Laxman was born on the 24th of October, 1921 in Mysore. His father was a headmaster and Laxman was the youngest of six sons. One of his elder brothers, R.K. Narayan, is a well-known novelist.

Laxman drew cartoons for The Hindu’, ‘Koravanji’ and later for ‘The Times of India’. He is known for his distinctive illustrations, most notably for ‘Malgudi Days’ written by R.K. Narayan.

He has won many awards that include the Padma Bhushan, Padma Vibhushan and the Ramon Magsaysay Award.

‘Mauritius’ is a travelogue adapted from ‘Idle Hours’ written by him.

Mauritius Summary in English
The author comes up with a detailed description of Mauritius in his essay by the same name. He says that Mauritius is a tiny speck of an island situated below the Equator on the twentieth parallel some 4,500 km. south-west of Mumbai. The world atlas which the author had was very old and contained many little dots and specks. These dots were either the products of cockroaches or the adverse effects of weather. They had nothing to do with geography. So Mauritius could not be easily located by the author in his atlas. The author’s experience on his journey to Mauritius was exciting. He was curious to see the sight below the flying aircraft.

Different aspects of the country such as the bluish-grey steel sheet-like ocean, acres and acres of cloud and land structures resembling the legendary historical’ structures of ancient countries fascinated him. The author remarks that people of different origins are found in Mauritius. There are Africans, Chinese, Biharis, Dutch, Persians, Tamils, Arabs, French and English. Of these, the Dutch, the French and the English who constantly waged battle for the possession of the island for its spices and sugar were called the ‘buccaneering trinity’. They were called so as their interest in Mauritius was piratical in nature.

The reason for the people of different countries to settle in Mauritius was for its spices and sugar or just for the strategic position on the maritime route to the East.

In Mauritius, cabinet ministers and others in big positions do not act as if they were born to grace. They are all just like ordinary people. They are unassuming, accessible, communicative and without the protective shield of hangers-on and security men to repel casual approaches.

The blue mountains ring the islands, a volcanic happening of geological ages. These mountains do not have the traditional monotonous pyramidal shapes. Their outlines are freakish and whimsical with unexpected sweeps and have perpendicular drops and pin-pointed peaks.

The author finds some names from the French language such as Trou aux Biches, Beau Bassin, Quarter Bomes, Curepipe, Rose Belle and so on musical but unpronounceable.

The author extends his study to the flora and fauna in Mauritius too. He finds that the trees found in Mauritius are short and gnarled even in the interior of jungles just like overgrown bonsai. The fauna are the bats, monkeys, deer and giant tortoises of Aldabra variety.

Mauritius is prone to cyclonic storms and it is an annual feature. Big ones occur once in 15 years and leave a trail of destruction. People are used to cyclones and have learnt to live with them. King cyclone, a massive cyclone, had struck Mauritius on February 6,1975 leaving vast areas flattened. The island has recovered from the devastation. Trees are planted in congested areas. Tall buildings have come up, plateglass picture windows are fixed and rooftops are put up with an eye on elegance.

On a cruise in a glass-bottomed boat, the author gets to see sea-shells, crabs, shapeless ugly creatures crawling in the dark depths and a school of fish, coloured bright lemon yellow with black bars. Fishes with hideous spikes all over their body, fishes with long tails, fishes with battered faces are also found.

The Government is eager to have foreign entrepreneurs start their industries here. The author opines that with industrial growth, the living space will shrink. Cars and trucks will increase. Their roads will have to be widened to take the load. The price of land will go up and flats will appear. Cost of living, pollution, unemployment, slums, taxation, controls will appear.

During his return flight the author could not see those scenes as it was dark. But he could imagine future Mauritius in a changed situation – industrialization with wider roads, tall buildings, pollution, unemployment, slums etc. He hopes that enlightened people will guide the growth of Mauritius and preserve this paradise on earth.

Glossary:

bearing (v): carrying
albeit: although
juxtaposition: put side-by-side
incongruities: out of place, absurd
indentured: bound by
strategic: important
spontaneity (n): resulting from natural impulse; not forced or suggested or caused from outside
whimsical: capricious, fantastic
precariously (adv): dependent on chance; uncertain, risky
ubiquitous: omnipresent, seeming to be everywhere
sprawling: be of loose, irregular form
gnarled: ragged
dwindling: diminishing gradually
buccaneering: piratical
(buka-neering)
relentlessly: unrelenting
trinity: a whole consisting of three parts (here, the three countries)
avidity (n): eagerness

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

QnA Of Chapter Mauritius.

An Astrologers Day

An Astrologers Day.

C1. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
What articles did the astrologer carry?
Answer:
The astrologer carried his professional equipment of a dozen cowry shells, a square piece of cloth with obscure mystic charts on it, a notebook and a bundle of palmyra writing.

Question 2.
What were the different names given by the nuts vendor for his business?
Answer:
R.K. Narayan highlights the creativity of the nuts vendor who refers to his business with different names. Bombay Ice Cream, Delhi Almond, and Raja’s Delicacy were the different names given by the nuts vendor for his ware.

 

Question 3.
What kind of life would the astrologer have in his own village?
Answer:
The strange turn of events transformed a farmer into an astrologer. If the astrologer had stayed back in his own village he would have carried on the work of tilling the land, which was the work of his ancestors. He would have married and grown old in his cornfield and ancestral home.

Question 4.
How much did the astrologer charge his clients?
Answer:
The astrologer charged his clients three paise per question.

Question 5.
Why did the astrologer remain silent for at least ten minutes, initially?
Answer:
Remaining silent for at least ten minutes initially was an intelligent move by the astrologer. The astrologer silently listened to his clients for the first ten minutes and gathered sufficient information to answer the questions of the clients.

Question 6.
What was the signal for the astrologer to bundle up?
Answer:
The astrologer conducted his business with the help of the lights in the shops around him and with the help of the flare of the nuts vendor. When the nuts vendor blew out his flare to go home, the astrologer also bundled up to go home.

 

Question 7.
How much did the astrologer demand from his new client to answer his question?
Answer:
At first, the astrologer demanded five rupees and then eight annas. After hackling for some time, the amount of one rupee was agreed upon to answer the questions.

Question 8.
What did the astrologer ask Guru Nayak to do?
Answer:
The astrologer recognized Guru Nayak the very minute he saw him. That is why he asked Guru Nayak to return to his village immediately and never travel southwards again.

C2. Answer the following:

Question 1.
Why did the astrologer have no light of his own for his business?
Answer:
The profession of the astrologer was such that semi-darkness added to the mystery of the set-up. That is why he was satisfied with whatever light was available from shop lights, a couple of hissing gaslights, some naked flares stuck on the poles. In fact, the astrologer did not want to be in the light. He just wanted enough light to give the impression that he was reading the face of his clients. He did not want the clients to read his face as he did not know anything about astrology.

Question 2.
Why did the astrologer close his business when the nuts vendor blew out his flare?
Answer:
The place, where these people conducted their business, did not have the benefit of municipal lighting. The nuts vendor had a flare stuck on the groundnut heap and the astrologer used to conduct his business by the light of flare that smoked up above the heap.

After his business was over, the nuts vendor used to blow out his flare and prepare to leave and the astrologer also used to do the same as there would be no light for him to continue with his business.

Question 3.
How efficient was the astrologer in his business?
Answer:
Despite the fact that the astrologer had no knowledge of astrology, he was efficient in his business. This was possible because he had a working analysis of mankind’s troubles, marriage, money and the tangles of human relations. Long practice had sharpened his perception. Within five minutes, he understood what was wrong. He would silently listen to his clients for the first ten minutes which provided him sufficient information to answer their questions.

In addition, he would make some general statements which would be true for all. The gullible client was easily led to believe that it was the power of astrology and was highly impressed.

 

Question 4.
“When shall I get him?”
Answer:

Who is the speaker?
The astrologer’s wife is the speaker.
Who does ‘you’ refer to?
‘You’ refers to the astrologer.
Why was he worried?
He was worried because he had seen the man whom he thought he had killed.
C3. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
Why did the astrologer run away from his village?
Answer:
The astrologer ran away from his village because of a false impression. The astrologer as a youngster drank, gambled and quarrelled with other people. Once, under the influence of alcohol he had fought with a man, stabbed and pushed him down a well. He thought that the man had died and ran away from his village to escape punishment.

Question 2.
In the story, do you think the astrologer should be punished for his crime?
Answer:
The crime committed by the astrologer was indeed very grave. Even though he ran away, he was guilty of the act. He had not. tried to kill the man in a cold-blooded manner. The act happened due to his drunken state. As a result of this, he was unable to return to his village, which itself was a punishment to him. If he had continued with that kind of life, he deserved punishment. As he was repentant, the difficulties he faced to escape the punishment was a punishment by itself. No. further punishment is needed.

 

Question 3.
Describe how the astrologer felt at the end of the story.
Answer:
Though the man had escaped from his village and was settled in a town in the guise of an astrologer, he was bogged down with the guilt of killing a man. So when he came to know that the man was not dead, he felt a great load lifted from him. He thought he had the blood of a man in his hands for many years. When he knew it wasn’t so, he felt very much relieved and light-hearted.

Question 4.
Describe the role of fate and chance in the story.
Answer:
The story shows that our life changes according to our fate. None of us can escape what we are destined for. Fate plays a decisive role in the story. A villager turns into an astrologer because of his fate. Again, it is the fate that brings the enemies face-to-face. However, the story also shows that not everything is dependent on fate.

The way the astrologer deals with his enemy shows that the astrologer who was irresponsible as a youngster has changed for the better. He is now mature and is able to deal with a difficult situation. Thus, R.K. Narayan shows that though we are bound by our destiny, we can control it to some extent if we have self-control.

Question 5.
Does the story make you think that all the astrologers are false?
Answer:
Just because the astrologer in this story is a sham, we cannot conclude that all astrologers are liars. There are scholars who have learnt astrology and predict events that would take place in the future. India is a nation that is famed for Vedic Sciences like astrology, yoga, etc. Hence, to dismiss all astrologers as quacks is not a healthy trend.

Moreover, even in the case of the astrologer of the story, though he is not a genuine astrologer, we see that he does no harm to people. He uses his understanding of people to earn his living. We should also remember that people go to him of their own free will.

 

Question 6.
How has R.K. Narayan portrayed the attractive appearance of the astrologer?
Answer:
The portrayal of the astrologer shows R.K. Narayan’s keenness of observation and strength of description. The astrologer had an appearance that suited his profession. His forehead was resplendent with sacred ash and vermilion and his eyes sparkled with a sharp, abnormal gleam which was really the outcome of a continued search for customers. However, it made the astrologer look wise in an uncanny manner.

C4. Read the following sentences from the story and arrange them in the sequential order as they appear in the story:

Take the next train and go home.
The astrologer pressed his invitation.
He was as much a stranger to the stars as were his innocent customers.
The astrologer caught a glimpse of his face by the match light.
The place was lit up by shop lights.
The child has been asking for sweets since so many days.
The nuts vendor blew out his flare and rose to go home.
Answer:

The place was lit up by shop lights.
He was as much a stranger to the stars as were his innocent customers.
The nuts vendor blew out his flare and rose to go home.
The astrologer pressed his invitation.
The astrologer caught a glimpse of his face by the match light.
Take the next train and go home.
The child has been asking for sweets since so many days.
Additional Questions:

Question 1.
Why was the place a remarkable one for the astrologer to sit?
Answer:
A surging crowd always moved up and down on that narrow road from morning till night; so it was a good place to catch clients.

Question 2.
Name the traders who occupied that place.
Answer:
Medicine sellers, sellers of stolen hardware and junk, magicians, an auctioneer of cheap cloth and a vendor of groundnuts occupied that place.

 

Question 3.
What was the one question that the client wanted to know about?
Answer:
He wanted to know if he would succeed in his present search.

Question 4.
Describe the appearance of the astrologer.
Answer:
On his forehead, the astrologer had smeared sacred ash and vermilion. There was something special about his eyes. There was a sparkle in them that attracted people. This light was mistaken as prophetic light by his simple customers even though it was nothing but the continuous searching look for customers that reflected through his eyes. He had dark mustache that came down to his cheeks. To complete the look he had a saffron-colored turban as well.

Question 5.
How was the astrologer successful in pleasing his customers?
Answer:
Though the astrologer had no knowledge of astrology, he could manage to astonish people with what he said. This he made possible with practice and shrewd calculation. He was clever enough to trick others with his guesses. He managed to make a living as an astrologer because of his experience. He knew that people had problems due to money, marriage and household issues. Within five minutes he could guess what was wrong and never spoke for the first ten minutes.

He let his customers talk and gathered information for many of the answers from which he would create his advice for them. He had some questions which he usually asked to get clues as to what advice he should give his customers. This way he was successful in pleasing his customers.

Question 6.
What challenge did the man put before the astrologer?
Answer:
The stranger challenged the astrologer by saying that if the astrologer gave him right answers for his questions then he would give him eight annas and if he failed then the astrologer would have to pay him back twice the amount. The astrologer happily accepted the challenge.

 

Question 7.
Why could the astrologer not live like his forefather?
Answer:
The astrologer was forced to leave his village and home in a hurry, without telling anybody about it. He could not rest until he left his village behind a couple of hundred miles. All this was because he thought that he had the blood of a man on his hands. In his village, when he was still a silly youngster, he had quarreled with one of his companions.

They were drunk, they gambled and in a fit of anger the astrologer stabbed and pushed the man into a well. Later, thinking that the man was dead, he fled his village. Due to this, the astrologer was unable to live like his forefathers in the village.

Question 8.
What did the astrologer tell the stranger about his enemy?
Answer:
Very soon the astrologer realized that the new client was searching for none other than himself. The astrologer was the person who had tried to kill the man. It was to his advantage that the client did not recognize him. Therefore, the astrologer made the best use of the opportunity and told him that his enemy had died.

And to satisfy his client he even said that the enemy had died a brutal death, coming under a lorry and being crushed by it. He also told his client never to stir out of his village again, particularly southward, which was the direction of this town. He told him that he would live to be a hundred if only he stayed in his village.

Question 9.
What was the reaction of the astrologer’s wife, seeing his day’s earnings?
Answer:
The astrologer’s wife was very pleased that her husband had earned twelve and a half annas that day. She was also overjoyed because she could prepare some sweets for her daughter. The child had been asking for sweets for so many days. So, she decided to buy some jaggery and coconut with which she planned to prepare the sweets.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
The astrologer used to begin his business punctually
A) in the evening
B) in the morning
C) at midday
D) at night.
Answer:
C) at midday

 

Question 2.
The astrologer’s eyes sparkled with a sharp abnormal gleam because
A) he had spiritual powers
B) he possessed magical powers
C) he looked continuously for customers
D) he was intelligent.
Answer:
C) he looked continuously for customers

Question 3.
…………. gave his ware a fancy name each day.
A) The medicine seller
B) The magician
C) The astrologer
D) The groundnut seller.
Answer:
D) The groundnut seller.

Question 4.
Though he was not a real astrologer, he said things which pleased and astonished everyone. It was because
A) he studied, practiced and did some guesswork
B) he said whatever came to his mind
C) another real astrologer was helping him
D) the groundnut seller helped him.
Answer:
A) he studied, practiced and did some guesswork

Question 5.
The astrologer never opened his mouth till his customer had spoken for about
A) five minutes
B) fifteen minutes
C) at least ten minutes
D) an hour.
Answer:
C) at least ten minutes

Question 6.
………… had sharpened the astrologer’s perception.
A) Mankind’s troubles
B) Practice
C) Money
D) The place.
Answer:
B) Practice

Question 7.
A stranger came when the astrologer was …………….. his professional equipment.
A) spreading out
B) giving away
C) packing up
D) selling.
Answer:
C) packing up

 

Question 8.
The astrologer caught a glimpse of the stranger’s face
A) in the shop’s light
B) in the light of the cycle lamp
C) by the match light
D) in the shaft of green light.
Answer:
C) by the match light

Question 9.
The astrologer wanted to go away without answering the stranger’s questions because
A) it was getting late
B) he was alone
C) he had recognized the stranger
D) he did not know the answers.
Answer:
C) he had recognized the stranger

Question 10.
The stranger was in search of the person who had
A) cheated him
B) taken away his property
C) tried to kill him
D) been very kind to him.
Answer:
C) tried to kill him

Question 11.
The stranger did not die in the well because
A) he climbed out of the well
B) a passerby rescued him
C) the villagers rescued him
D) his friends helped him out.
Answer:
B) a passerby rescued him

Question 12.
The astrologer knew the name of the stranger as Guru Nayak, because
A) he guessed his name
B) Guru Nayak told his name
C) Guru Nayak had tried to kill the astrologer
D) he had quarreled with him and stabbed him long ago.
Answer:
D) he had quarreled with him and stabbed him long ago.

Question 13.
Guru Nayak’s enemy
A) was living in the guise of an astrologer
B) died as he deserved
C) was crushed under a lorry
D) died four months ago.
Answer:
A) was living in the guise of an astrologer

 

Question 14.
The astrologer felt relieved because
A) he had killed a man
B) he was not a murderer
C) Guru Nayak had recognized him
D) Guru Nayak had gone away.
Answer:
B) he was not a murderer

Language Activities:

A) Vocabulary:

V1. Word formation:

Make new words by adding the ending given in the box to the root words. Fill in the table with the new words. You may have to add/drop a letter from the root word to make a new word. Put a cross (?) where the ending and the root word do not match.

ed ing er ty ful less
1. Help
2. End
3. Hope
4. Enjoy
5. Shape
6. Smile
7. Run
Answer:

ed in% er iy fill less
1. Help Helped Helping Helper ? Helpful Helpless
2. End Ended Ending ? ? ? Endless
3. Hope Hoped Hoping ? ? Hopeful Hopeless
4. Enjoy Enjoyed Enjoying Enjoyer ? ? ?
5. Shape Shaped Shaping Shaper Shapely ? Shapeless
6. Smile Smiled Smiling ? Smiley ? Smileless
7. Run ? Running Runner ? ? Runless
V2. Fill in the blanks with suitable letters to arrive at the given meaning:

…………sent = gift
…………sent = hate
………….sent = agreement
………….sent = approval
Answer:

pre
re
as
con

V3. Homophones are words that sound similar but are different in spelling and meanings. Here are a few words:

peace – piece
lone – loan
hour – our
died – dyed
fore – four
raze – raise
bear – bare
break – brake
pair – pear
role – roll
Find out the meaning of the above words and use them in sentences.

Peace – freedom from disturbance.
He just wanted to sleep in peace.
Piece – a part of something.
He cut the cake into six pieces.
Lone – single.
Thrishka was the lone survivor of the air crash.
Loan – credit.
The rate of interest for the housing loan has come down.
Hour – unit of time.
The train was late by an hour.
Our – belonging to us.
We should value our culture.
died – expired.
The old man died peacefully after meeting his grandson.
Dyed – colored.
Since the colour of her frock ran, Rani dyed it with red color.
fore – front.
The forelimbs grew rapidly.
four – a number.
India needed four runs to win.
Raze – demolish.
The bomb razed the building to the ground.
Raise – lift.
Sunil could not raise the heavy suitcase and put it under the table.
Bear – tolerate.
Women have great capacity to bear pain.
Bare – uncovered.
The scam has been unearthed and the truth remains bare.
Break – smash.
The fireman had to break open the window pane to save the child.
Brake – a mechanism to slow down.
The accident took place when the driver was unable to apply the brake.
Pair – two of a kind.
I can’t find a matching pair of socks.
Pear – the name of a fruit.
The pear is a juicy fruit.
Role – responsibility.
In my role as secretary of the student council, I had many responsibilities to shoulder.
Roll – revolve.
The vase rolled off the edge of the table and smashed.
V4. Match the meanings of the following phrases and use them in sentences of your own:

On account of – owing to
On account of the strike, many people starved for days together.
To bear with – to put up with
I have to bear with the trouble makers of my class.
In the midst of – in the middle of
She sang in the midst of all the disturbances created by the unruly children.
To be accustomed to – to get used to
We should get accustomed to the strange behavior of eccentric people.
To take a new turn – to begin a new course
Every girl takes a new turn in her life once she gets married,
Bereft of – deprived of
Bereft of her wealth, Ragini lost many of her money-minded friends.
B) Grammar And Usage:

G1. Reported speech:

Complete the following sentences:

Direct Speech Reported Speech
1. He said, “I live in New York”.
2. She said: “I am going to go shopping”.
3. He said, “I’ll see you later”.
4. Anu said, “I went to a movie last night”.
5. James asked: “Do you want to come out tonight?” He said that ………… in New York.
She said that ………….. going to go shopping.
He said ……………
Anu said that she ………… to a movie the previous night.
James asked if he wanted to go out that night.
Answer:

Direct Speech Reported Speech
1. He said, “I live in New York”.
2. She said: “I am going to go shopping”.
3. He said, “I’ll see you later”.
4. Anu said, “I went to a movie last night”.
5. James asked: “Do you want to come out tonight?” He said that he lived in New York.
She said that she was going to go shopping.
He said that he would see him later.
Anu said that she had gone for a movie the previous night.
James asked if I wanted to go out that night.
G2. After observing the changes from direct into reported speech, now change the following sentences into reported speech.

Imagine that you decided to pay a surprise visit to some friend’s house last week. Report the questions that your host asked you, using the phrases given below.

He asked if …………..
He tried to find out ……………
He wondered if …………..
He inquired me …………….
He wanted to know if ……………
Answer:

He asked when I had arrived.
He asked me whether I was all right.
He enquired when I had had lunch.
He asked whether I wanted coffee.
He suggested that I phone them.
G3. Error corrections:

I. Punctuate the following sentences:

Rashmi said Yamuna you are late today
Rashmi said, “Yamuna, you are late today”.
what a beautiful garden it is
What a beautiful garden it is!
people enjoyed the cricket match don’t they
People enjoyed the cricket match, didn’t they?
unless he improves his bowling he cannot be selected for the match
Unless he improves his bowling, he cannot be selected for the match.
II. Spot the errors in the following sentences and rewrite them:

They are going to Himalayas.
They are going to the Himalayas.
Raju prefers idli than chapati.
Raju prefers idli to chapati.
One of the boy looks sad.
One of the boys looks sad.
Mathematics are my favorite subject.
Mathematics is my favourite subject.
A bunch of keys were found in my room.
A bunch of keys was found in my room.
My neighbor is a honest man.
My neighbor is an honest man.
Rafi wanted an one rupee.
Rafi wanted a rupee.
Kiran’s brother is a M.L.A.
Kiran’s brother is an M.L.A.
Our school bought a lot of furnitures.
Our school bought a lot of furniture.
I met an European.
I met a European.
An Astrologer’s Day by R. K. Narayan About The Author:

R.K. Narayan was a well known Indian writer in English. He wrote a number of novels as well as short stories in English. He created an imaginary town called Malgudi in his writings. He is credited with bringing Indian literature in English to the rest of the world, and is regarded as one of the greatest novelists of India.

His works include ‘The Financial Expert’, ‘The Guide’, ‘The English Teacher’, etc. His writing career spanned over sixty years, earning him a number of awards and honors. These include the AC Benson Medal from the Royal Society of Literature and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second-highest civilian award.

An Astrologer’s Day Summary in English
The story begins with the description of an astrologer who is sitting under a tamarind tree. On the forehead he has smeared sacred ash and vermilion. There was something special about his eyes. There was a sparkle in them that attracted people. This light was mistaken as prophetic light by his simple customers whereas R.K. Narayan describes this as the outcome of the continuous search for customers. He had dark mustache that came down to his cheeks. To complete the look he had a saffron coloured turban as well.

He had cowrie shells and a square piece of cloth with obscure mystic charts and a bundle of palmyra writing. He was always searching for a customer in the crowd. The place where he was seated was surrounded by a variety of other traders like medicine sellers, auctioneer of cheap cloth, magicians as well as people who sold stolen goods. There was a vendor who sold fried groundnuts but called his product by different names each day like ‘Bombay Ice-cream’, ‘Delhi Almond’, ‘Raja’s Delicacy’, etc. Most of the people who came to the vendor went to the astrologer too.

The entire place was lighted with shop lights. This is a very common sight in India. The astrologer was someone who knew very little of his own future. He was as much unaware of the stars as his customers, yet he could manage to astonish people with what he said.

This he made possible with practice and shrewd calculation. He was clever enough to trick others with his guesses. He managed to make a living as an astrologer because of his experience. He knew that people had problems due to money, marriage and household issues. Within five minutes he could guess what was wrong and never spoke for the first ten minutes. He let his customers talk and gathered information for many of the answers from which he would create his advice for them. He had some questions which he usually asked to get clues as to what advice he should give his customers. Each question was charged at the rate of three paise.

One evening, after the nut vendor had blown out the light and when every other trader was getting ready to go home, the astrologer saw a man before him. The man challenged the astrologer by saying that if the astrologer gave him the right answers for his questions then he would give him eight annas and if he failed then the astrologer would have to pay him back twice the amount. The astrologer happily accepted the challenge. But when he saw the man’s face from the light of a match stick, he quickly gave back the amount he had taken.

The man caught the astrologer by his wrist and said he could not back out now. The astrologer finally agreed to speak for a rupee and he began. The man was shocked by the astrologer’s revelations. He said that the man was once left to die and that he was stabbed with a knife once. He also said that the man was pushed into a well near a field. The astrologer even goes to the extent of calling the man by his name – Guru Nayak.

With this the man is very pleased and impressed with the all knowing astrologer’s knowledge. The astrologer advises the man to go back to his home town and never travel southwards again. He proceeds to say that the man who he was looking for is no longer alive. Four months ago he met with an accident and was crushed under a lorry. To this the man says that he was there in search of that man to take revenge and now that he was dead he would return home. The man leaves and the astrologer returns home. He tells his wife about his life before he met her.

He tells her that in his home town he used to play cards, gamble, drink and quarrel. It so happened that one day he picked up a quarrel with a man and in the heat of the moment stabbed him. He pushed him into a well and left him for dead.

He left his village thinking that he had the blood of another man on his hands. But now he says he can live peacefully not because Guru Nayak is alive but that after today’s session he would never come back there again. Guru Nayak could not identify the astrologer and the astrologer easily escaped from the hands of his enemy. After telling his wife of what had happened he stretched himself on the pyol and went to sleep. His wife was happy to get the money paid by the stranger as she could prepare some sweets for her child who had been asking for sweets for some days now.

Glossary:

obscure: difficult to understand
mystic: spiritual
prophetic: predictive
paraphernalia: belongings
mutter: incoherent/incomprehensible speech
gratified: thankful

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

Stories Of Anansi’s

Stories of Anansi’s

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

C1. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
Who owned the stories in the beginning?
Answer:
In the beginning, Nyame, the Sky God, owned the stories.

Question 2.
Who wanted to own them later?
Answer:
Anansi, the spider, wanted to own them later.

Question 3.
What was the price to be paid to own all the stories in the world?
Answer:
Mmoboro – the hornets, Onini – the python and Osebo – the leopard, had to be given to Nyame – the Sky God as the price to own all the stories in the world.

 

Question 4.
Did Anansi agree to pay the price?
Answer:
Yes, Anansi agreed to pay the price.

Question 5.
Why did Anansi pour water on himself and over the hornets?
Answer:
Anansi poured water on himself and over the hornets because he wanted to make the hornets believe that it was raining.

Question 6.
What did Anansi capture the hornets in?
Answer:
Anansi captured Mmoboro, the hornets, in a gourd by making a small hole in it.

Question 7.
What dispute did the spider have with his wife?
Answer:
Anansi’s wife felt that the python Onini was not longer, but shorter and weaker than a bamboo pole. Anansi disagreed with this and it led to a dispute.

Question 8.
What suggestion did Onini give to find out the truth about his length and strength?
Answer:
Onini suggested that Anansi measure him against the length of the bamboo pole to find out the truth about his length.

 

Question 9.
Why did Anansi tie Onini at one end of the pole?
Answer:
Anansi tied Onini at one end of the pole because when Onini stretched at one end he was getting shorter at the other. So Anansi suggested that the python be tied to the bamboo pole to ensure that he was straight and there was no mistake being made about his length.

Question 10.
Where and why did Anansi dig a pit?
Answer:
Anansi dug a deep pit in the forest to capture the leopard Osebo.

Question 11.
Why did Anansi bend a tall green tree over the pit? Anansi bent a tall green tree towards the ground over the pit in order to pull out Osebo from the pit.

Question 12.
Why did the Sky God offer Anansi all the stories?
Answer:
Anansi was offered all the stories by the Sky God Nyame because he had fulfilled all the conditions of Nyame. He had brought Mmoboro – the hornets, Onini – the python and Osebo – the leopard to Nyame.

Question 13.
What should anyone acknowledge before telling a story?
Answer:
All should acknowledge that the stories belonged to Anansi before telling a story because all the stories and tales now belonged to Anansi who had successfully won them over from the Sky God.

C2. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
Describe how Anansi captured the hornets for the Sky God.
Answer:
Anansi was clever at cheating the hornets. He made them believe that it was raining and that they needed protection from the rain. Anansi first cut a gourd from a vine and made a small hole in it. He took a large calabash and filled it with water. He went to the tree where the hornets lived. He poured some of the water over himself so that he was dripping. He threw some water over the hornets making them all wet.

Then he put the calabash on his head, as though to protect himself from a storm and called out to the hornets and asked them why they were staying in the rain. When the hornets said that they had nowhere else to go, he told them to go into the gourd through the small hole. When the last of them had gone in, Anansi plugged the hole with a ball of grass. He took the gourd full of hornets to Nyame, the Sky God.

 

Question 2.
Explain how the python got trapped.
Answer:
We see that the python got trapped because of his vanity. Anansi used this weakness of the python to trap it. Anansi went “v to the forest and cut a long bamboo pole and some strong vines.

Then he walked towards the house of Onini, the python. All the while he kept talking to himself that his wife was stupid to say that Onini was shorter and weaker than that bamboo. Hearing this, Onini offered to be measured against the bamboo to solve the dispute. Anansi laid the pole on the ground and the python came and stretched himself out beside it. Anansi remarked that the python was a little short. When the python stretched at the head he was shorter at the tail and vice-versa.

So, with his consent, Anansi tied Onini’s head and tail firmly to the pole. He wrapped the vine around Onini until he was unable to move on the pretext of stretching him out against the bamboo. When the python was thus constricted, Anansi took the python to the Sky God as prisoner.

Question 3.
What method did the spider Kwaku Anansi adopt to get the leopard demanded as a price for the ownership of all tales and stories of the world?
Answer:
As we can see, the leopard was the most formidable of all the opponents of Anansi. Clever Anansi knew that if he had to deal with the leopard, he should ensure that the leopard was already in a disadvantageous position. That is why he thought of a clever ploy. Anansi went into the forest and dug a deep pit where the leopard was accustomed to walking.

He covered it with small branches and leaves and put dust on it so that it was impossible to know where the pit was. Osebo came prowling in the black night, stepped into the trap, and fell to the bottom. The next morning Anansi went to the pit and saw the leopard there.

Osebo asked for help from Anansi. Anansi bent a tall tree towards the ground so that its top was over the pit and he tied it that way. Then he tied a rope to the tree and dropped the other end of it into the pit. Anansi asked Osebo to tie the rope to his tail. When Osebo did as he was told, Anansi took his knife and cut the rope that held the tree bowed to the ground. The tree straightened up with a snap, pulling Osebo out of the hole and ‘ he hung in the air upside down. Anansi then easily killed him and took his body to Nyame, the Sky God.

C3. Read the following statement carefully and in pairs discuss the points you would like to include in your justification. Elaborate each point.

“With wisdom and knowledge, one can achieve the impossible” – Justify the statement with reference to Kwaku Anansi, the spider.
Answer:
Interestingly, we see that Anansi who wanted to buy all the stories from the Sky God was already a storyteller. With each of his victims, he used a story to cheat them. Anansi used his imagination to weave convincing stories and his insight made it possible for him to look into the weaknesses of the hornets, the python, and the leopard to catch them.

When Anansi, the spider, wanted to be the owner of all the stories in the world, he went to Nyame, the Sky God, to purchase the stories. Nyame said that he was willing to sell the stories, but the price was very high. Nyame added that even the rich and powerful families were not able to pay the price. The Sky God then asked three things as price: Mmoboro – the hornets, Onini – the python and Osebo – the leopard. Anansi agreed. Though he did not have the physical strength to capture them, he used his wisdom and knowledge and achieved the impossible.

He made the hornets get into the gourd, tied the python to the pole and he tied the leopard to the tree using his wisdom and knowledge. Thus Anansi, though physically not as strong as his opponents, could achieve what others were not able to. Thus, we see that the power of the brain is stronger than the strength of the brawn.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
Why did people not buy the stories from the Sky God?
Answer:
Because the price was too high for them.

 

Question 2.
Why did Anansi call his wife stupid?
Answer:
Anansi wanted to draw the attention of the python. So, he said that his wife was stupid to say that the python was shorter and weaker than a piece of bamboo.

Question 3.
What did Anansi mean when he said, “I give him more respect. She gives him less respect”?
Answer:
Anansi wanted to impress the python. He wanted the python to react and so he said that while he respected the python. his wife did not.

Question 4.
What did Osebo request of Anansi?
Answer:
Osebo requested Anansi to help him come out of the pit.

Question 5.
Why did Anansi refuse to help Osebo at first?
Answer:
Anansi said that Osebo would be thankless. As soon as he was out of the pit, he would be hungry and would want to eat Anansi and his children. So, he refused to help Osebo come out of the pit.

Question 6.
What made Anansi agree to help Osebo?
Answer:
Osebo swore not to kill Anansi and his children. Therefore, Anansi agreed to help Osebo.

 

Question 7.
Why did Anansi call them all ‘foolish’?
Answer:
Each of them – the hornets, the python, and the leopard fell into the trap of Anansi as expected by him. Therefore, Anansi called them ‘foolish’.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
Originally all the stories belonged to
A) Kwaku Anansi
B) Mmoboro
C) Osebo
D) Nyame.
Answer:
D) Nyame.

Question 2.
………….. wanted to buy all the stories known in the world.
A) Osebo, the leopard
B) Onini, the python
C) Anansi, the spider
D) Mmoboro, the hornets.
Answer:
C) Anansi, the spider

 

Question 3.
Rich and powerful families could not buy the stories because
Answer:
A) the Price was too high for them
B) the Price was too low for them
C) the stories were Priceless
D) Nyame refused to sell them
Answer:
A) the Price was too high for them

Question 4.
Anansi tricked the hornets into entering ……………. and caught them.
Answer:
A) a calabash
B) a dry gourd
C) a bottle
D) a box
Answer:
B) a dry gourd

Question 5.
The dispute the spider had with his wife was about
A) the intelligence of the hornets
B) the intelligence of Onini
C) the strength and length of Onini
D) the price of the stories.
Answer:
C) the strength and length of Onini

Question 6.
Anansi caught the python
A) with a net
B) by making it enter a basket
C) by tying it to a pole
D) with the help of a calabash.
Answer:
C) by tying it to a pole

 

Question 7.
Anansi went into the forest and dug a deep pit where
A) Onini used to crawl often
B) the hornets flew
C) Osebo was accustomed to walk
D) nansi used to go for a walk.
Answer:
C) Osebo was accustomed to walk

Question 8.
Whenever a man tells a story, he must acknowledge that it is
A) Onini’s tale
B) Osebo’s tale
C) Nyame’s tale
D) Anansi’s tale.
Answer:
D) Anansi’s tale.

Question 9.
The Sky God had set things as the price.
A) five
B) two
C) three
D) one
Answer:
C) three

Question 10.
Anansi cut a ………….. to catch the hornets.
A) pumpkin
B) gourd
C) cucumber
D) bamboo.
Answer:
B) gourd

Question 11.
The hornets lived in a
A) tree
B) thicket
C) building
D) nest
Answer:
A) tree

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Question 12.
The python stretched beside the
A) pole
B) tree
C) gourd
D) Vine
Answer:
A) pole

Question 13.
Anansi wrapped the python with
A) rope
B) cloth
C) vine
D) bamboo
Answer:
C) vine

Language Activities:

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

A) Vocabulary:

V1. Use the following words in sentences of your own:

yearn
plug (v)
accustomed
onward
acknowledge
measure.
Answer:

Yearn: to long for
I yearn to possess an i-pad in which I can store many interesting stories.
Plug: to fill
We were able to plug the hole with cement.
Accustomed: habituated
I am accustomed to drinking green tea in the morning.
Onward: forward
While booking for the onward journey, we also booked for our return journey.
Acknowledge: recognize
It is decency to acknowledge the help of others when we write our success stories.
Measure: to find the size, quantity, speed etc.
The tailor can tell the length of a piece of cloth by just looking at it.
V2. Which of the following expressions do you think are appropriate? Choose/tick the right one.

a shining star/a glittering star
a shining star.
busy traffic /heavy traffic
heavy traffic.
a stomach ache/a stomach pain
a stomach ache.
backside the house /behind the house
behind the house.
a severe fever/a high fever
a high fever.
B) Grammar And Usage:

G1. Here are some sentences from the lesson. Can you supply a suitable question tag to each one of them, choosing from the box given below?

I can do it,…………….?
I should first have Mmoboro,……………..?
I will bring them,……………..?
Osebo, you are half foolish,…………..?
My wife is stupid,………….?
I give them more respect,…………….?
My opinion was not good as my wife’s,……………?
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 6 All Stories are Anansi’s 1
Answer:

can’t I?
shouldn’t I?
won’t I?
aren’t you?
isn’t she?
don’t I?
was it?
G2. Identify the verbs and conjunctions and fill in the blanks:

1. They shouted loudly.
Verb: …………..
Conjunction:
None

2. He tried his best but he failed.
Verb: …………….
Conjunction: …………..
Type of conjunction:
Coordinating
conjunction 3. He worked as if he was in a hurry.
Verb: …………..
Conjunction: …………..
Type of conjunction: ……………….
Answer:

They shouted loudly.
Verb – shouted
Conjunction – none
He tried his best but he failed.
Verb – tried; failed
Conjunction – but
He worked as if he was in a hurry.
Verb – worked, was
Conjunction – as if

Type of conjunction – adverb clause.
Sentence 1 is a simple sentence.
Sentence 2 is a compound sentence.
Sentence 3 is a complex sentence.

Now compare the three sentences and list the differences:

Simple sentence Compound sentence Complex sentence
1. has only one finite ………
2. can be divided into ………. and predicate. 1. has two or more …………
2. Has …………… conjunctions.
3. has (one/ two) parts that can stand independently. 1. has two or more ………..
2. Has …………… conjuction.3. has (one/ two) main Clauses.
4. has one or more subordinating clauses that depend on the main clause for their meaning.
Answer:

Simple sentence:
Has only one finite verb.
Can be divided into subject and predicate.
Compound sentence:
Has two or more finite verbs.
Has coordinating conjunctions.
Has two parts that can stand independently.
Complex sentence:
Has two or more finite verbs.
Has subordinating conjunction.
Has one main clause.
Has one or more subordinating clauses that depend on the main clause for their meaning.
G3. State whether the following sentences are simple, compound or complex sentences:

Either take it or leave it.
Rome was not built in a day.
People who are given to quarreling cannot be happy.
Many are called but few are chosen.
No one can harm us as long as we remain friends.
God made the country and man made the town.
I will read that book if you advise me to do so.
We returned when sunset.
There is no hope of her recovery.
The president appointed him governor.
Answer:

Compound
Simple
Complex
Compound
Complex
Compound
Complex
Complex
Simple
Simple
Speaking And Reading:

S1. Write a sentence for each of the following situations ‘making a polite request’. You can use any polite phrase suitable to the situation.

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 6 All Stories are Anansi’s 2
Answer:

Could you please give me a ticket to Delhi?
I would be grateful to have the exam time-table.
I would appreciate it if I could have the exam time-table.
May I have the bottle of pickle please?
May I have an ice-cream please?
Could you please tell me a story grandma?

S2. Read the graph and answer the questions that follow:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 6 All Stories are Anansi’s 3

Question 1.
What data does the graph represent?
Answer:
The graph represents the data of C02 emission from the transport sector in Delhi, India.

Question 2.
What was the pollution level in 2005?
Answer:
In 2005, the pollution level was more than 4500 metric tons, but less than 5000 metric tons.

Question 3.
What is likely to happen in 2020?
Answer:
In 2020, the pollution level is likely to increase to almost 10000 metric tons.

 

Question 4.
When was the pollution level the lowest?
Answer:
The pollution level was the lowest in 1997.

Question 5.
Is this situation prevalent only in Delhi?
Answer:
No, this is the case in all cities.

S3. Writing Activity:

Imagine yourself to be a walking stick and write down some of your experiences. Use the clues given below to write the ‘Autobiography of a Walking Stick’.

birth
place of birth
life in the outside world
first owner/other owners – interesting or strange experiences
last days.
Answer:
Autobiography of a walking stick
I had my birth when people were nearing their death. It is said that it had to be so. But I suppose, birth and death are not in our control. Anyway, I am happy that I got the chance to come into the world of men after a woodcutter brought a piece of log to a businessman who makes walking sticks in his factory. The businessman bought me for a pretty cheap price but sold me for an attractive amount to a wealthy old lady who asked him for a special walking stick.

The businessman sang my praises, talking about my durability and lightweight, and made me swell with pride. But alas! The old lady died within a few days of buying me and I was confined to the darkness and loneliness of the loft. My gilded handle rested in a comer until the old woman’s granddaughter had a fall and started limping.

Since the doctor advised her not to put weight on her right foot, she started using me. She dusted me and made me shine all over again. How nice it was to take care of the young and pretty girl! Not many walking sticks that were around had the privilege. But lo! The young are not as careful as the old… She threw me around so carelessly that on a fateful day I was broken into two unequal parts…

I lay in a comer again waiting for a carpenter to join me and bring me back to circulation. But that did not happen. When the family shifted to a new place, they dumped me with all the other useless stuff… Oh! How I wish I were a branch on the tree, alive and kicking, instead of lying slump in a comer!

All Stories are Anansi’s by Harold Courlander About The Writer:

This story is written by an American writer named Harold Courlander (1908-1996). He was a novelist, folklorist, anthropologist and an expert in the study of Haitian life. He specialized in the study of African, Caribbean, Afro-American and American Indian cultures. The following is a fable from an ancient culture.

All Stories are Anansi’s Summary in English
Background:
In the language of the Ashanti people, Anansi means ‘spider’. The word ‘nan’ means ‘to spin’. Ashanti folktales are known as Ananisem, which means ‘story’ and which may or may not be about spiders.
Anansi is an African folktale character. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories. He is also one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore. The prescribed lesson is an Anansi story that explains the phenomenon of how his name became attached to the whole corpus of tales.

Summary:
Once there were no stories in the world. The Sky God, Nyame, had them all. Anansi went to Nyame and asked how much the stories would cost to buy. Nyame set a high price. He had three conditions: Anansi must bring back the Mmoboro Hornets, Onini the python and Osebo the leopard.

Anansi set about capturing these. First he went to catch the hornets. Anansi filled a calabash with water and poured some over himself and some over the nest, calling out that it was raining. He suggested that the hornets get into the empty calabash, and, when they obliged, quickly sealed the opening. Then, he went to where the python lived carrying a long bamboo pole and some strong vines.

He debated out loud whether the python was really longer than the bamboo pole or not as he and his wife had debated over. The python overheard him and, when Anansi explained the debate, agreed to lie along the bamboo pole. Because the python could not easily make himself completely straight, a true impression of his actual length was difficult to obtain. When he stretched at one end, he got shorter at the other end. So the python agreed to be tied to the pole. When he was completely tied, Anansi took him to Nyame.

To catch the leopard, Anansi dug a deep hole in the ground. When the leopard fell into the hole, Anansi offered to help him out with a strong rope. He bent a tall tree towards the ground so that its top was over the pit, and he tied it that way. Then he tied a rope to the tree and dropped the other end of it into the pit.

“Tie this to your tail”, he said. Osebo tied the rope to his tail. “Is it well-tied?”Anansi asked. “Yes, it is well-tied”, the leopard said. “In that case”, Anansi said, “you are not merely half-foolish, you are all-foolish”.

And he took his knife and cut the other rope, the one that held the tree bowed to the ground. The tree straightened up with a snap, pulling Osebo out of the hole. He hung in the air head downward, twisting and turning. And while he hung this way, Anansi killed him with his weapons.
Then he took the body of the leopard and carried it to Nyame, the Sky God, saying: “Here is the third thing. Now I have paid the price.”
Nyame said to him: “Kwaku Anansi, great warriors and chiefs have tried, but they have been unable to do it. You have done it. Therefore, I will give you the stories. From this day onward, all stories belong to you.

From the story we see that there are two kinds of people on earth: The tricksters and the ones who are tricked. If we are not intelligent enough, we will fall prey to the cleverer lot. And that is why, in parts of Africa, people love to narrate, and love to hear the stories they call ‘spider stories’.

Though it is a simple story of a trickster, a few insights can be gathered from the story:
When one is very determined, nothing is impossible.

Since Anansi really wanted to own all the stories in the world, he did everything he could to acquire his goal.
Strength is not measured by size.
Anansi was just a small spider but he conquered animals bigger than he was.
Glossary:

yearn: have a strong feeling of longing for something
hornet: a kind of large wasp
gourd: the large hard-skinned fruit of a climbing or trailing plant
plugged: blocked.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

Chapter/Prose Stories Of Anansi’s Questions and Answers.

A Question Of Space

 A Question Of Space

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

C1. Read the lesson silently. The sequence of events in the lesson has been given below in a jumbled order. Rearrange them and write.

Anuj had started journalism on his own and took up photography later.
“It will help you witness your reactions as if they were happening to someone else”.
He felt that he needed time to pursue his own interests and pleasures, especially after he met Anuj.
The conflict had acquired a distinct edge ever since he had met Anuj.
“If you still have not found out, when do you intend to enroll?”
Anuj had turned into a friend very quickly, a much older friend.
“It seems to me that the pressure is worse for children of doctors
His class grades had dropped; he had started skipping group tuitions..
Answer: The conflict had acquired a distinct edge ever since he had met Anuj.
Anuj had turned into a friend very quickly, a much older friend.
His class grades had dropped; he had started skipping group tuitions.
Anuj had started journalism on his own and took up photography later.
“It seems to me that the pressure is worse for children of doctors”.
“It will help you witness your reactions as if they were happening to someone else”.
“If you still have not found out, when do you intend to enroll?”
He felt that he needed time to pursue his own interests and pleasures, especially after he met Anuj.

C2. The extract given in the second column tells us about the persons mentioned in the first column. Write your response in the third column.

Person Extract from the story What this tells us about them.
Vikrant I am already full up with tuitions. He is finding it difficult to cope with the pressure of his studies.
Vikrant’s
father

It would be better if you turned your attention to investigating a coaching center rather than spend time with junkies and irrelevant things.
Vikrant’s
mother

Mother was harping on the importance of the year for getting a good grip on science and maths
Anuj If you want to get control over a situation, you could start by observing your body’s reaction.
Answer:

Person Extract from the story What this tells us about them.
Vikrant I am already full up with tuitions He is finding it difficult to cope with the pressure of his studies.
Vikrant’s father It would be better if you turned your attention to investigating a coaching center rather than spend time with junkies and irrelevant things. Vikrant’s father is annoyed with him because Vikrant is hanging around with Anuj and is showing more interest in photography. Vikrant’s father feels that this is the outcome of Vikrant’s association with Anuj and he refers contemptuously to Anuj as a junkie who distracts Vikrant with irrelevant things.
Vikrant’s mother Mother was harping on the importance of the year for getting a good grip on science and maths The word ‘harping’ shows that the mother had the habit of nagging. She does not understand the passion of her son for photography. Instead of encouraging him in the area of his interest, she wants him to pursue what she and her husband are interested in. Just because they are doctors, she wants their son also to become a doctor.
Anuj If you want to get control over a situation, you could start by observing your body’s reaction. Anuj wants to help Vikrant. He knows that Vikrant is in a difficult situation as his and his parents’ interests are at loggerheads. Anuj knows that it is pointless to confront people and that confrontation only leads to unpleasantness. He knows that. it is reconciliation that would be beneficial. That is why he wants Vikrant to keep his emotions under control. Anuj knows that Vikrant would have great self­control if he studied his own feelings and his body’s response to the same.

C3. Answer the following questions in three or four sentences each:

Question 1.
Vikrant’s mother was harping on the importance of the year. Why was she anxious about Vikrant?
Answer:
Vikrant’s mother was talking about class XI as a good foundation for class XII. She knew that class XII would be a decisive year as it would show whether Vikrant had the scope to get admitted in a good institution for medical studies. Vikrant’s mother was anxious that Vikrant should ready himself to cope with the intensely competitive environment that had to be scaled for getting admission to a prestigious medical college. She showed her concern to mould the career of her son.

 

Question 2.
Anuj had spun into Vikrant’s life like a ‘new universe’. Why did Vikrant feel so? Who was Anuj?
Answer:
Anuj was a newfound friend of Vikrant. Though much older, he could understand Vikrant’s problems and be of help, Anuj was not just a person with dynamic ideas on photography; he could also throw light on the connectedness between human beings and all other living species. He gave new ideas to Vikrant for self-analysis – particularly the body language of the self and how to control expressions and feelings.

Question 3.
‘The identity ofVikrantzvithAmij created tension between Vikrant and his parents’. How did it happen?
Answer:
As an only child, Vikrant was the apple of his parents’ eye and they had all their hopes pinned on him. Being doctors, they hoped that Vikrant too would become a doctor. When Vikrant’s class grades dropped and he began skipping group tuitions and even extra school classes designed for the weekends, naturally his parents were upset. Tension grew between Vikrant and his parents over his identity with Anuj because they thought that it was Anuj’s bad influence that made Vikrant neglect his studies.

Question 4.
Vikrant said, “Medicine is considered …………… gives prestige”. Is this thought prejudicial? Do you agree with this opinion?
Answer:
Medicine is considered the noblest of all professions because it is in this profession that human beings save the life of other human beings. In other words, they are godly in their role as healers. Since it is considered a noble profession, it is considered prestigious also. There is nothing wrong in this line of thought. However, there are two points that go contrary to the idea. The first one is that not all doctors are noble. There are quite a few doctors who have refrained from saving lives just because their demands are not met. Secondly, it is not true that the other professions are not noble. Each profession has its own importance.

Question 5.
What was the reply of Anuj when Vikrant asked him how his suggestions would help him?
Answer:
When Vikrant asked Anuj how his suggestions would help him, Anuj replied that it would help him to witness his reactions as if they were happening to someone else. While observing his body and its reactions, he also had to distance himself from them. This distance would help him to observe his reactions and also control them by growing aware of them. This whole process can be termed as responding and not reacting to a situation. When you respond in a calculative manner without reacting instantaneously, you are being proactive and not reactive. This would be beneficial for all.

Question 6.
When did Vikrant start his self-observation? What did he observe? (Refer paras 23-25)
Answer:
Vikrant started his self-observation when he was in a conversation with his father. Once when Vikrant was having a talk with his father, he noticed that his mouth was dry, his head tight at the temples and his body slightly hunched. Vikrant noticed that his father’s last remark sent a strong wave of heat through his otherwise weary body, galvanizing him to leave the room without another word.

 

Question 7.
How did Vikrant’s father try to convince him to join tuitions for medical entrance?
Answer:
According to Vikrant’s father, tuitions for medical entrance were not just tuition. They coached him for a career, for a highly competitive exam. One wrong answer could make all the difference. It would be better if he turned his attention to investigating a coaching centre, rather than spend time with junkies and irrelevant things.

Question 8.
What are the last two steps of self-observation suggested by Anuj to Vikrant?
Answer:
Anuj suggested two last steps of self-observation to Vikrant. In the first one, the moment an active feeling comes, if it should be controlled, Vikrant should make a note of it without expressing it. In the second one, the person should express an emotion opposite to what one actually feels. If one is agitated, the minute one observes that the body language exhibits the agitation, one should consciously choose to express calm or warmth instead of coldness. In fact, the method of observing our own body language ensures that we don’t react immediately, but take time to respond maturely.

Question 9.
‘He did this with an awareness that it was the right thing for him to do.’ What does ‘awareness’ refer to here?
Answer:
‘Awareness’ refers to understanding. Vikrant who had all along resisted his parents’ desire that he enrol in a coaching class as a preparation for medicine, had the awareness that just as they had encouraged him in his interest, he should abide by their interest. So, Vikrant enrolled for classes at a coaching center for a medical entrance test. This he did with awareness about his future career. He was capable of deciding for himself. He could analyze his interests and come to a conclusion about what he had to do for his prosperity.

Question 10.
The word ‘Space’ in the title of the lesson has a significant reference. Comment on the title.
Answer:
Space in the title of this lesson has a significant role to play. It does not refer to physical space. It is a metaphoric reference to individual choice and freedom. It refers to that room or opportunity for one’s own interests. Generally, the interests and ideas of parents, friends and society are imposed on the children who are in the growing stage.

C4. Read the following extracts from the lesson carefully and explain each of them with reference to the context:

Question 1.
“Hey! What’s up? You look grim”.
Answer:
This sentence is taken from the lesson ‘A Question of Space’ by Neera Kashyap. The sentence is uttered by Anuj near the jogging track. Anuj puts this question to Vikrant as he looks quite dull and depressed, after being rebuked by his parents about his decreasing academic performance. Vikrant is like a bird in the cage which wishes to be free in the blue sky. But he feels trapped. Seeing his condition, Anuj asks the question above.

Question 2.
“But tell me, how do you react to pressure?”
Answer:
This sentence is an extract from the lesson ‘A Question of Space’ by Neera Kashyap. When Vikrant asks Anuj if his parents put pressure on him to become a photojournalist, Anuj answers in the negative. Vikrant feels that the pressure is worse for the children of doctors because medicine is considered the noblest among all professions and therefore gets prestige. So he asks Anuj how he reacts to such pressure.

 

Question 3.
“Sure. . . Why not? Actually, our range of expression is quite limited”.
Answer:
This sentence is selected from the lesson ‘A Question of Space’ by Neera Kashyap. This is said by Anuj to Vikrant. When Vikrant wants to clarify whether it is necessary to observe the body when one feels happy or excited or adventurous, and not necessarily only when one is under pressure, Anuj replies thus. Anuj continues that when one gets his full range of emotions, he will become aware of all his habitual expressions.

Question 4.
“If you still have not found out, when do you intend to enroll?”
Answer:
The sentence above is chosen from the lesson ‘A Question of Space’ by Neera Kashyap. When Vikrant’s father asks whether he has found out which is the most suitable coaching centre for his medical entrance test, Vikrant replies in the negative. At that point, Vikrant’s father reacts in this manner.
The reaction shows his annoyance with Vikrant.

Question 5.
“You cannot really change anything till things are ready for change”.
Answer:
This sentence is taken from the lesson ‘A Question of Space’ by Neera Kashyap. These are the wise words of advice of Anuj to Vikrant. Anuj notices one evening that Vikrant has a sense of discouragement because he is not able to make his parents see his viewpoint. So Anuj advises him not to be unduly perturbed over things which are beyond his area of control. Anuj wants Vikrant to take things as they come without losing his composure. However, Vikrant, who does not have the maturity of Anuj, is not able to understand the import of the words of Anuj.

C5. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
Compare and contrast the characters – Vikrant and Anuj. Who would you like to be – Vikrant or Anuj? Justify your answer.
Answer:
Vikrant and Anuj build a rapport despite the difference in age. The only similarity between them is that both of them are from reputed families. Vikrant is a student of class XI whereas Anuj is a grown-up person, working as a photojournalist. Anuj acts as the confidante of Vikrant when Vikrant is getting worried and depressed over his parents’ pressure all the time to study more for the Class XII examination and medical entrance examination.

When Vikrant is in this state of being pressurised by his parents, he comes to know that Anuj has chosen to study photography as per his liking. He is even more surprised to know that Anuj’s parents have no objection to his pursuing his interests. It is at this point that Anuj helps Vikrant to analyze his own feelings and expressions to handle the pressure. Vikrant gets influenced by Anuj’s guidance and experience.

Thus we see that of the two, Anuj is more mature and is in a position to guide Vikrant. His advice to Vikrant on controlling his emotions shows that he is mature in his outlook and attitude. Hence it would be the desire of everyone to be like Anuj.

 

Question 2.
After Vikrant follows Anuj’s advice, we observe a change in his attitude and behaviour. Trace the chain of these changes.
Answer:
Once Vikrant develops a friendship with Anuj, he confides in him about the pressure from his parents. Vikrant
also tells Anuj about being disturbed by this. At that juncture, Anuj advises Vikrant on self-observation. He tells Vikrant to start observing his body whenever he feels a strong emotion. As per the advice of Anuj, Vikrant starts noticing his own body’s behavioural changes. After this self-observation, Vikrant realises that conflicts are not getting him anywhere. He also realises that he is not totally averse to the idea of studying medicine.

It is only that he does not want to be bulldozed into working three shifts a day, six days a week. He needs time to pursue his own interests and pleasures. After this stage, Vikrant tries to practise emotions which he has not experienced, yet is able to simulate. At first these are positive emotions of joy, spontaneity and excitement. When he feels more neutral, he practises a wider range. His experiments with self-observation help him see a whole range of his body reactions and the effects that different emotions have on the body and how the mind gets involved with these.

Question 3.
What is the role played by Anuj in this lesson? What message does the author convey to the reader through his character?
Answer:
Anuj is a true friend who helps Vikrant in need. We see that though Anuj has nothing to gain, he spends a lot of time to advise Vikrant and to solve his problems. After meeting Anuj, Vikrant feels he needs time to pursue his own interests and pleasures. We see that Anuj plays the role of a counselor guiding Vikrant. It is appreciable that he does not speak a single word against Vikrant’s parents.

The only piece of advice he gives Vikrant is to be aware of his emotions and to control them. He also speaks to him on various issues like his hobby of photography and self-observation. He also advises Vikrant not to worry too much about the change as no one can really change anything till things are ready for change. Thus, the author says that a positive approach to things or events can alter situations. Self-observation helps one to control one’s own feelings and expressions.

Question 4.
Assume yourself to be Vikrant. Write a letter to a friend discussing the ways in which you transformed yourself.
Answer:
Hi Susheel,

How have you been? I’m sure that you are surprised by this unexpected letter from me. I know that ours is the age of WhatsApp. But I have decided to take recourse to the older method of snail-mail because I want to share with you something dear to my heart.

I remember telling you a couple of months ago that I was upset with my parents for pressurizing me over my preparation for class XI exam and enrolment in a coaching center as preparation for the medical course. I was under a lot of stress because I felt my parents did not understand me and were forcing me to do, without giving me space, what I didn’t want to do. I didn’t like the idea of decisions about my future being unilaterally made by others. But there was a change in my viewpoint because of the timely intervention of one of my friends called Anuj.

Anuj is a photo-journalist and his unique ideas on a wide range of topics drew me to him. Though my parents didn’t like the idea of my spending a lot of time with him, it is because of him that my problems with my parents got resolved.

When Anuj realized that I was getting agitated over the conditions put by my parents over me, he taught me the technique of self-observation to control my emotions. He told me that it was important to note how our body reacts to emotions, both positive and negative, for self-awareness. Once we are aware of our physical behavior, we can control our mental thoughts.

This is possible because of the stage of distancing that takes place. When we start observing our physical responses, we distance ourselves from them. When we distance ourselves from our own behavior, we are more objective about ourselves and are able to control our thoughts. Moreover, when we control our negative physical behavior, we don’t displease people with whom we interact. But most importantly, we also realize that we ourselves could be in the wrong.

The same thing happened to me also. To begin with, when my mother made derogatory references to Anuj and my hanging out with him, as usual, I was angry. But once I started observing my physical reaction, I was able to control my agitation, retain my poise and speak calmly about what my association with Anuj meant to me. With this assertive but not arrogant behavior, I could convince my parents that they had to allow me to accommodate my interests even as I tried to do justice to my academic performance.

When my parents exhibited the spirit of accommodation, I too felt that their insistence on my pursuance of medical degree was not at all a bad idea. Thus, there was reconciliation between my parents and me and I can now say, ‘All is well that ends well.’ But all this was possible because of a level-headed, intelligent and empathetic person – Anuj.

When you come down next, let’s make it a point to meet him. I’m sure you will immensely enjoy his company. Do let me know when you plan to come down.

Warm regards
Vikrant

Question 5.
Do you have a dream/or a desire to do something? If yes, say how you would like to realize the same, in 10-15 sentences.
Answer:
Yes, like everyone else, I too have a dream. In fact, I have many dreams. But the most overpowering of them all is to be a winner in one of the reality shows. But alas! I am not especially gifted in any particular field of activity. I am neither a singer nor a dancer. It is true that I croon occasionally and tap my feet rhythmically. But it will not suffice to win an award. I cannot draw even straight lines; neither can I speak effectively.

Yet I want to be a winner. So I hope there will be a reality show for ordinary people like me, good at nothing; yet having the dream of winning. I hope to be a contestant in a reality show in which you get eliminated one by one because of your talent and the one with no talent at all wins. If there is a reality show of this kind, I will surely win and that is my dream!

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
Vikrant found himself completely out of breath
A) because he had jogged for 3.2 km
B) he had been thinking of his exams
C) his father had scolded him
D) his mother did not want him to go out.
Answer:
A) because he had jogged for 3.2 kms

Question 2.
Vikrant’s parents were
A) not interested in his studies
B) pressurising him to gear up for the medical entrance exams
C) forcing him to become a journalist
D) forcing him to become a photographer.
Answer:
B) pressurising him to gear up for the medical entrance exams

 

Question 3.
Vikrant’s class grades dropped because
A) he was studying hard
B) he developed new interests
C) he went astray
D) he was not interested in studies.
Answer:
B) he developed new interests

Question 4.
Doctors want their children to become doctors because
Answer:
A) it is easy to study medicine
B) the profession brings a lot of money
C) medicine is the noblest profession
D) it is easy to deal with patients.
Answer:
C) medicine is the noblest profession

Question 5.
Anuj wanted Vikrant to notice
A) his reactions as if they were happening to someone else
B) Anuj’s behaviour
C) the reactions of his parents
D) how his friends react in different circumstances.
Answer:
A) his reactions as if they were happening to someone else

Question 6.
Anuj advised Vikrant to
A) study hard
B) look for good coaching centres
C) practise expressions when there are no feelings
D) express what he feels
Answer:
C) practise expressions when there are no feelings

Question 7.
The last step suggested by Anuj to Vikrant was
A) to say no to his parents
B) to walk away
C) to express an emotion opposite to what he felt
D) to express an emotion as he felt it.
Answer:
C) to express an emotion opposite to what he felt

Question 8.
Finally, at the end of Class XI, Vikrant
A) stopped following Anuj’s advice
B) decided to stop studying
C) joined a coaching centre for medical entrance
D) decided to study engineering.
Answer:
C) joined a coaching centre for medical entrance

Question 9.
Anuj had turned into a photo-journalist because
A) his parents had pressurized him into it
B) this profession earned him a lot of money
C) he had a passion for it
D) he was not good at anything else.
Answer:
C) he had a passion for it

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Question 10.
Anuj became a very good friend of Vikrant because
A) he was older
B) he also exercised with him
C) his dynamic ideas on photography and interest in self-improvement attracted Vikrant
D) he was very rich.
Answer:
C) his dynamic ideas on photography and interest in self-improvement attracted Vikrant

Question 11.
Tension grew between Vikrant and his parents because
A) Vikrant spent more time with Anuj
B) Vikrant’s interest in photography increased but his grades started dropping
C) Vikrant didn’t talk to them
D) Vikrant refused to study.
Answer:
B) Vikrant’s interest in photography increased but his grades started dropping

Question 12.
It is good to practice expressions when there are no feelings to be expressed because
A) it helps you to cheat others
B) one can experience the effect that different emotions have on the body
C) you can make others happy
D) one can become a good actor
Answer:
B) one can experience the effect that different emotions have on the body

Question 13.
Vikrant felt he could work hard towards a career if
A) he attended coaching classes soon after class XI
B) his parents let him pursue his new interests
C) he did not bother about coaching class and pursued only his interests
D) he had more time.
Answer:
B) his parents let him pursue his new interests

LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES:

A. VOCABULARY:

V1. Emotions

The nouns such as pleasure, spontaneity, excitement, etc., are used to express actions, emotions or feelings and the quality of actions. Pick out such words from the lesson which express emotions and put them under the following Columns.

Pleasant Unpleasant
e.g. glee e.g. dejection
Answer:

Pleasant Unpleasant
happy anxious
excited ‘ suspicion
adventurous dismay
joy hostility
spontaneity scorn
warmth discouragement
calm coldness
satisfaction agitated
glee hopeless
pleasure tension
excitement pressure
worry
dejection
confrontation
V2. Match the words in column ‘A’ with the corresponding meanings given in column ‘B’. You can use a dictionary to verify your answers.

A B
1) Stevedore a) one who studies rocks and soils
2) Chauffeur b) one who loads and unloads ships
3) Geologist c) one zoho drives a car for someone else
4) Juggler d) one who is in charge of a museum
5) Anthropologist e) one who performs tricks with the hands to amuse others
6) Auditor f) one who studies human development
7) Curator g) one who examines the financial records of a company.
Answer:

b
c
a
e
f
g
d
V3. Phrasal Verbs:

A) Complete the following sentences with a phrasal verb that includes one of the particles and one of the verbs given below.
Particles: down, in, out, up
Verbs: turn, come, slow, let, go, drop, grow, warm, plug, pull.
Eg. a) Please _______ for a cup of coffee whenever you are passing by.
Answer:
drop, in

b) Would you ______ the television _______ , please. It’s very loud.
Answer:
turn, down

The dentist says John will have to ______ two teeth ______.
Videos are cheaper now. Prices have actually ______ ______ since the 1980’s.
He could play the guitar when he was six. I think he’s going to be a great musician when he _____ _____.
___ ____! You are driving much too fast!
Smoking is not allowed in here. Please _____ _____ that cigarette.
You must be very cold. Sit by the fire and _____ _____
There’s someone at the door. Can you _____ them ______ please?
Look, there’s the plug on the floor. You haven’t _____ the television ______.
Answer:

pluck; out
come down
grows up
Slow down
put; out
warm-up
let; in
plugged; in

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

B) Find the meanings of the following phrasal verbs and use them in sentences of your own:

Come across, get on, take part, getaway, get through, keep out, think over, take down, look into.

Come across: find by chance
Ramesh came across his old classmate at the bus stop.
Get on: be friendly
Indians get on very well with total strangers.
Take part: participate
Students should have the interest to take part in extra-curricular activities.
Getaway: manage to escape
Nobody can get away with wrongdoing.
Get through: pass
It is very difficult to get through the CA examination.
Keep out: stay away
Tell the children to keep out of mischief!
Think over: consider, judge, weigh the pros and cons
You should think over the prospects of starting a new business venture in Mangalore.
Takedown: write
The boss was so fast that the stenographer could not take down all the points.
Look into: investigate
Only after the women’s organizations condemned the incident, the Minister ordered the police to look into the case.
C) Match the meanings of the phrasal verbs in column A with their meanings in column B.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 5 A Question of Space 3
Answer:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 5 A Question of Space 4

B. GRAMMAR AND USAGE:

COMPARISON

G1. Comment on the information using a comparative and superlative adjective.

Venus has a diameter of 12,104 kilometers. It isn’t as big as the Earth, which has a diameter of 12,756 kilometers. The earth is ………………. bigger than Venus.
The Mona Lisa is worth many millions of dollars. No other picture in the world is so valuable. The Mona Lisa is ……………. the most valuable picture in the world.
Telecom Tower is 180 meters tall, but Canada Tower in East London is 250 metres tall. The Canada Tower is …………… taller than the Telecom Tower.
Cambridge University dates from 1284, but it is not as old as Oxford University, which dates from 1167. Oxford University is …………………. older than Cambridge University.
Toby, who lived in New York, was a much-loved dog. When his owner died, she left $ 75 million, which made him a world record
breaker among wealthy dogs. Toby was ………………… the wealthiest dog in the world when his owner died.
G2. A)The chart below shows the information on the expenses incurred in conducting the Annual Sports Meet in a school. Study the chart carefully.

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 5 A Question of Space 5
The total cost estimated for the Annual Meet is Rs. 90,500.

No. of events : 70 (50 Track and Field events and
20 Throws and Jumps)
No. of athletes : 750 (450 Girls + 300 Boys)
Staff on duty : Teachers – 65 (25 men + 40 women),
Support Staff 20 (10 men + 10 women), Staff on Parking and Security duty 15 ‘ (10 men + 5 women)
Medals: 70 Gold, 70 Silver, 70 Bronze
Best Athlete Trophies : Boys 3, Girls 3
Best House Trophies : 4 (1 for each category and 1 overall)
Assume you are the Sports Secretary in charge of the School Annual Sports Meet. Taking information from the chart, prepare an oral presentation for the Management Committee of the school. Use as many expressions of comparison as you can.
Answer:
The Annual Sports Day of KVG School was carried out with pomp and glory. The expenses show that the least amount was spent on invitations, souvenir, and certificates as it came up to only 5% of the total expenditure. The biggest amount coming up to 30% was spent on the cultural programme. The amount spent on mementos and trophies at 15% was more than the amount spent on the tent, chairs, and decoration which was at 10%. The expenditure on refreshments was as much as that of mementos and trophies but was less than that of sports equipment, the expense of which stood at 25%.

There were 70 events on the whole, and the track events were more than the field events. Among the athletes, girls numbering up to 450 were more than boys who were only 300. Even among the staff on duty, there were more women than men, the ratio being 40:25. However, the support staff who were 20, had 10 men and 10 women. Gold, Silver and Bronze medals, 70 each, were bagged by the 750 athletes. Three boys and three girls were awarded the Best Athlete Trophies. Four Best House Trophies, one in each category, and one Overall Trophy were also presented.

B) Read the following article in which the writer compares the treatment of boys and girls.

Complete the article by filling in the spaces with appropriate words from the box given below.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 5 A Question of Space 6
For many parents, especially those who are poor and illiterate, a girl is a ‘lesser child’. Doesn’t it make you mad to know that girls aren’t given an equal chance to be born? Though female infanticide was banned by law over a century ago, thousands of . girls are killed before they are born or when they are babies.

Even the girls who are allowed to survive live with less of everything …………… girls are sent to school ………….. boys. They get ……………. medical care, so …………. girls die. Boys get …………… nutritious food and also …………… time to play …………….. jobs are open to girls, and even if they are employed, they are not paid as ……………. as boys. Most of all, they get ……………. respect. They are not given as ……………… opportunities as the boys to speak out on
matters that concern them. And yet, a girl usually does twice as ………….. work ……………. a boy, not only in the house but also in the fields.

This discrimination and bias must end, and end now! Can we count on your support?
For many parents, especially those who are poor and illiterate, a girl is a ‘lesser child’. Doesn’t it make you mad to know that girls aren’t given an equal chance to be bom? Though female infanticide was banned by law over a century ago, thousands of girls are killed before they are bom or when they are babies.

Even the girls who are allowed to survive live with less of everything. Fewer girls are sent to school than boys. They get less medical care, so many girls die. Boys get much nutritious food and also much time to play. Few jobs are open to girls, and even if they are employed, they are not paid as much as boys. Most of all, they get less respect. They are not given as many opportunities as the boys to speak out on matters that concern them. And yet, a girl usually does twice as much work as a boy, not only in the house but also in the fields.
This discrimination and bias must end, and end now! Can we count on your support?

C) Read the information and complete the sentences using more, most, less, least, fewer, or fewest.

There isn’t as much crime in the country areas as there is in cities. There’s ………….. than in the cities.
There’s less crime in the country areas than in the cities.
No other state of the U.S. has as much rain as Louisiana. Louisiana …………. rain.
Louisiana in the U.S. has the most rain.
The Green Party candidate didn’t get many votes. All the other candidates got more. The Green Party candidate ………….. votes.
The Green Party candidate got the least votes.
There are lots of passengers on the buses in the daytime, but not so many in the evenings. In the evenings ………….. on the buses.
In the evenings there are lesser passengers on the buses.
At the moment Arsenal has 42 points. No other club has more than 37. Arsenal points.
Arsenal has the most points.
Seiko has made very little profit. In fact it has made less than any other supermarket. Seiko …………. profit.
Sellco has made the least profit.
The accident rate among young drivers is higher than among older drivers. Young drivers …………… than older drivers.
Young drivers have more accident rate than older drivers.
D) Complete the conversation. Put in less, least, more, most, or as.

Lobo: I’m going to Delhi next week, so I’ll have to book my flight.
I think it’ll be more convenient to go by air than by train.
Peter: I’d go by train. Trains are comfortable than planes.
Lobo: But the train fare is really expensive. The plane isn’t …………… expensive as the train, which always surprises me.
Peter: I hate flying. It’s my …………… favourite means of transport.
Lobo: Well, I don’t mind it. And I’m not keen on trains as you are. A short flight is …………….. boring than a long train journey, I find.
Peter: I’d rather drive than fly.
Lobo: I’m definitely not driving. No, thank you. Driving all the way would be the …………… stressful way of getting there.
Peter: I don’t think driving is ……………. stressful as flying.
Lobo: Well, it is to me.
Peter: And will you be able to get a flight at the right time? Planes are …………… frequent than trains, aren’t they?
Lobo: Oh, there are plenty of flights. There’s one at ten in the morning. That’ll be the …………….. convenient.
Answer:

Lobo: I’m going to Delhi next week, so I’ll have to book my flight. I think it’ll be more convenient to go by air than by train.
Peter: I’d go by train. Trains are more comfortable than planes.
Lobo: But the train fare is really expensive. The plane isn’t as expensive as the train, which always surprises me.
Peter: I hate flying. It’s my least favorite means of transport.
Lobo: Well, I don’t mind it. And I’m not as keen on trains as you are. A short flight is less boring than a long train journey, I find.
Peter: I’d rather drive than fly.
Lobo: I’m definitely not driving. No, thank you. Driving all the way would be the most stressful way of getting there.
Peter: I don’t think driving is as stressful as flying.
Lobo: Well, it is to me.
Peter: And will you be able to get a flight at the right time? Planes are less frequent than trains, aren’t they?
Lobo: Oh, there are plenty of flights. There’s one at ten in the morning. That’ll be the most convenient.
E) Rewrite the sentences using ‘the ……………..the ……………’:

How well I sleep depends on how late I go to bed.
The later I go to bed, the better I sleep.
I don’t spend much time with my family because I work so hard.
The harder I work, the less time I spend with my family.
The traffic moves very slowly as more cars come into the city.
The more cars that come into the city, the slower is the traffic.
How much you sweat depends on how hot you feel.
The hotter you feel, the more you sweat.
The idea becomes less attractive as I think about it more.
The more I think about it, the less attractive the idea becomes.
How much petrol a car uses depends on the size of the engine.
The bigger the size of the engine, the more petrol a car uses.
F) Superlatives:

Which of the following do you like the best? Write one or two sentences comparing your choices.

Fresh fruit juice, Coca-cola, Maaza.
I like fresh fruit juice the best because it is the healthiest.
Disco dance, Indian classic, Pop dance.
I like Indian classic dance the most because it is the most spiritual.
Dance, singing, drama.
I like dance the best because it is the most spontaneous.
Fruit, chocolates, ice creams.
I like chocolates the least because they are the least healthy.
G) Error correction
Each sentence below contains an error. Identify and correct the error and rewrite the sentence correctly:

The faster land animal in the world is a cheetah.
The fastest land animal in the world is a cheetah.
His grade is the same as mine.
His grade is the same as my grade.
Sarla is slightly taller to Suman.
Sarla is slightly taller than Suman.
Our house is bigger as than yours.
Our house is bigger than yours.
The Vidhana Soudha is most prominent building in Bengaluru.
The Vidhana Soudha is the most prominent building in Bengaluru.
Speaking: Group Activity

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

S2. Conversation

B) Pair work. Prepare a dialogue that seeks and gives information about any other country.

Manju: Hi Mrinal, I’m planning to visit Germany. Could you please give me a few tips about the places worth visiting? I remember that you went to Germany last year.
Mrinal: Yes, I did. I visited my niece whose husband is working for Robert Bosch in Germany. I had a lovely time there. Germany is a Western European country with a landscape of forests, rivers, mountain ranges and North Sea beaches. So there are many tourist spots of natural beauty.
Manju: What about historically important places?
Mrinal: It has over 2 millennia of history. Berlin, its capital, is home to art, the Brandenburg Gate and many sites relating to WWII.
Manju: Which is the place that I must visit without fail?
Mrinal: Frankfurt. Frankfurt, with its skyscrapers, houses the European Central Bank. Frankfurt is a central German city on the River Maine, and it is a major financial hub that’s home to the European Central Bank. It’s the birthplace of famed writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose former home is now the Goethe House Museum. Like much of the city, it was damaged during World War II and later rebuilt. The reconstructed Altstadt (Old Town) is the site of Romerberg, a square that hosts an annual Christmas market.
Manju : Thank you for the information. What was the amount you spent on the entire tour?
Mrinal: In Germany it is Euro and each Euro is nearly Rs. 70, Rs.68.60 to be exact. I spent only on my travel which was within Rs. 1,00,000. Since my niece took care of my stay and outing, I didn’t have to spend on anything else.
Manju : Oh, ok… Let me see how much to keep aside. Thanks again.
or whatever is written with it. This aspect gives the message that the more good we become, the more good others feel about us. The pains and sufferings in our life make us better and wise human beings.
A Question of Space by Neera Kashyap About The Author:

Neera Kashyap started her working career as a journalist with the Hindustan Times and went on to specialize in environment and health journalism as senior researcher and editor with Centre for Science & Environment and Voluntary Health Association of India respectively. Later she specialized in social and health communications chiefly in the fields of HIV/ AIDS, reproductive health and poverty.

Tapping her literary bent, she has published a book of stories for children (Daring to Dream) and anthologies of prize-winning stories for Children’s Book Trust. These stories reflect both the stresses facing children as well as magic realism, tapping deeper layers of the sub-conscious. She currently focuses on interpreting subtle meanings in Hindu and Buddhist scriptures and literatures for modem readers.

A Question of Space Summary in English
The lesson ‘A Question of Space’ written by Neera Kashyap discusses a burning contemporary issue. The author takes up the problem of parental pressure on children and shows how parents go by what they consider right for their children. It is alright if parents are concerned about their children and have a say in their future. But it is not right if they do so without lending a patient hearing to what the children have to say. Also, very often, parents go by popularly held ideas about education and careers. They are not concerned about the likes and dislikes of their children. This leads to a lot of friction between parents and their children.

The children also have no control over their emotions. They feel that their parents unnecessarily interfere in their life. They don’t understand that it is natural for parents to be concerned about their children. It is as if there is no solution for this problem because each seems to be right. However, the lesson shows that all is not lost and the children can make their parents understand their viewpoint if only they behave wisely and with thoughtfulness. The present lesson demonstrates how self- observation leads to self-improvement and change in attitudes. It is also a psychology-based lesson, which suggests to us how to control our emotions.

Vikrant is an only child of a successful doctor couple, who want him to become a doctor too. Vikrant is a student of XI standard and his day is filled with more and more studies. His parents constantly force him to study hard in order to get admission to a prestigious medical college.

It is at this juncture in his life that Vikrant meets Anuj, a photojournalist. Vikrant meets him on the jogging tracks and while conversing with him Vikrant asks him if he has been forced by his parents into this profession. Anuj replies that he has taken it up out of his own choice. However, Anuj realizes that there is something amiss in the life of Vikrant, and asks Vikrant if he is pressurized by his parents and how he reacts to the pressure. Vikrant replies that he argues with his parents and even walks out in anger.

Anuj advises him to keep observing how his body reacts when he is upset. Vikrant follows the advice of Anuj and . notices that whenever he gets upset, his body starts clenching, mouth gets dry and his head grows tight at the temples. Vikrant confides that he has felt it when his parents put pressure on him to join tuitions for medical entrance. Unable to bear the pressure everytime his parents make such references, he walks out on them.
The next day Vikrant tells Anuj that observing his body reactions and emotions was not helping him to solve his problem.

Then Anuj gives him the most important advice. He asks him to express an emotion opposite to what he feels. He adds that if he is agitated, he should express his anxiety as calmly as possible. Vikrant tries Anuj’s advice and finds that he is able to bear the pressure much better and also notices that his parents are also willing to listen to his point of view and are agreeable to support him. Surprisingly, Vikrant also realises that he too is prepared to consider his parents’ proposition. Thus, a hopeless situation turns into a win-win situation.

Thus, Vikrant controls his emotions and moods with the help of self-observation. He, at the end of class XI, enrols for coaching classes for medical entrance exam with the awareness that he is doing the right thing. Thus, self-observation leads Vikrant to self-improvement.
Thus the lesson shows how to bridge the gap between the parents and the children. It shows that if children are prepared to move a step forward in the process of easing friction, parents are also ready to take that extra step.

Glossary:

pounded (ppt): hit, throb
cosmos (n): everything (universe)
daft (adj): silly, foolish
glee (n): happiness, delight
junkies (n): useless, unwanted
weary (adj): tired, exhausted
galvanizing (v): provoking, stimulating
scorn (n): contempt, disrespect
chafe (v): irritated, annoyed
dejection (n): sadness, depression
agitated (adj): disturbed
objectively (adv): without prejudice, without bias
refrain (v): avoid doing, abstain
hobnob (v): associate, go around with
confrontation (n): disagreement

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

English Chapter. The Story Teller

Chapter The Story Teller.

Chapter. The Story Teller

The Story Teller.

C1. Answer the following questions in a sentence each:

Question 1.
Who were the occupants of the carriage?
Answer:
The occupants of the carriage were an aunt with a small girl, a smaller girl and a small boy and a bachelor.

Question 2.
What questions haunted Cyril when he saw sheep in the field?
Answer:
When Cyril saw some sheep in the field he wanted to know why the sheep were being driven from one field to another. When he was given the lame answer that the grass in the other field might be better, he wanted to know why it was better.

 

Question 3.
What made the aunt decide that the bachelor was a hard and unsympathetic man?
Answer:
The author indirectly points out that bachelors get annoyed by the repetitive and persistently demanding behavior of children. Bachelors have no patience with the grown-ups who are incompetent at handling children. During their journey in the railway carriage, the three small children got bored and restless.

Their innumerable questions could not be answered by their aunt. Seeing the distractions by the children and the unsuccessful effort of the aunt, the bachelor’s frown was changing to a scowl. Observing this, the aunt decided that the bachelor was a hard and unsympathetic man.

Question 4.
Who saved the little girl in the aunt’s story?
Answer:
The aunt’s story was built on the cliched idea that the good get rewarded. The little girl was saved from a mad bull by a number of rescuers who admired her moral character.

Question 5.
Name the little girl in the bachelor’s story.
Answer:
The little girl in the bachelor’s story was Bertha.

Question 6.
What remark of the bachelor’s story created a wave of reaction in favor of the story?
Answer:
The idea that being good can be unpleasant appealed to the children. The word ‘horrible’ in connection with goodness was a novelty. It seemed to introduce a ring of truth that was absent from the aunt’s tales of infant life.

Question 7.
How did the Prince of the country come to know about Bertha?
Answer:
The Prince of the country came to know about Bertha from everybody who talked about her goodness.

Question 8.
How did the Prince of the country honour Bertha?
Answer:
The Prince of the country allowed Bertha to walk in his park once a week which was outside the town.

 

Question 9.
Why was it a great honour for Bertha being allowed into the Prince’s park?
Answer:
Being allowed into the Prince’s park was a great honour for Bertha because no children were allowed into the park.

Question 10.
When did Bertha begin to wish that she had never been allowed into the park?
Answer:
When a wolf entered the park and started chasing her, Bertha began to wish that she had never been allowed into the park.

Question 11.
The wolf located Bertha while she was hiding in the bushes by
a) sniffing around
b) the clinking sound of the medals
c) her spotlessly white pinafore.
Answer:
(b) the clinking sound of the medals.

Question 12.
What was the aunt’s reaction to Bertha’s story?
Answer:
Naturally, the aunt thought of the story as improper. She thought that the bachelor’s story had undermined the effect of years of careful teaching. Though the aunt had her own reasons to think so, she should have also realized that if stories turn out to be merely preaching material, they fail to convince the children.

C2. Answer the following in a few lines each:

Question 1.
How did the bachelor describe

the pigs in the park
the fish in the park
the wolf in the park?
Answer:

The pigs in the park: The bachelor knew how to capture the attention of the children. He said that there were lots of little pigs running all over the place. They were black with white faces, white with black spots, black all over, grey with white patches and some were white all over. They had eaten all the flowers.
The fish in the park: There were ponds with gold and blue and green fish in them.
The wolf in the park: The wolf which came prowling into the park was enormous. It was mud colour all over, with a black tongue and pale grey eyes that gleaned with unspeakable ferocity.
Question 2.
What qualities of Bertha earned her the three medals?
Answer:
Bertha won several medals for goodness. She earned a medal for obedience, another medal for punctuality and a third for good behavior.

 

Question 3.
Give reasons for:

the absence of sheep in the Prince’s park
the absence of flowers in the Prince’s park
Bertha feeling sorry for the absence of flowers in the Prince’s park.
Answer:

The absence of sheep in the Prince’s park: There were no sheep in the Prince’s park because his mother had a dream once that her son would be killed by either a sheep or a clock falling on him.
The absence of flowers in the Prince’s park: There were no flowers in the Prince’s park because the pigs had eaten them all.
Bertha feeling sorry for the absence of flowers in the Prince’s park: Bertha had promised her aunts that she would not pick any of the kind Prince’s flowers and she had meant to keep her promise. It made her feel silly to find there were no flowers to pick.
Question 4.
What are the two different thoughts of Bertha on her being extraordinarily good, when she was in the Prince’s park?
Answer:
Initially, when Bertha was walking up and down the park admiring the trees, the ponds with fish, the beautiful parrots, the hummingbirds, she felt that she was able to enjoy all these only because she was extraordinarily good, It was because of that she was let into the park.

When the wolf started chasing her to eat her, she ran and hid in the myrtle bushes terribly frightened and thought to herself that if she had not been extraordinarily good, she could not have been allowed into the park and she wouldn’t have had to face the hungry wolf and could have remained safe in the town.

C3. Discuss in groups and answer the following questions:

Question 1.
How did the medals earn respect for Bertha, as well as cause her death?
Answer:
Bertha was an extremely well-behaved girl and won medals for obedience, punctuality, and good behavior which were pinned on her dress every day. Every day people talked about her dress and the Prince of the country got to hear about it and allowed her to walk once a week in his park. It was a beautiful park and the children were not allowed in it. So it was a great honor for Bertha to be allowed to go there.

Once when she was in the park, Bertha saw a wolf stealing towards her. She hjd herself behind a bush. Being unable to trace her, the wolf tried to go in search of a pigling. But when Bertha trembled and her medals clinked, the wolf could locate her and killed her.

 

Question 2.
The aunt terms the bachelor’s story the most improper one. Do you agree with her? Give reasons.
Answer:
In her own way, the aunt was right because it is important that we influence children positively and make them have faith in the power of the good. However, when we narrate stories, we need to be imaginative so that we don’t lose out on the interest of the children. When it comes to the bachelor’s story, we see that technically it is a brilliant story as it has a powerful description, convincing turn of events and an interesting plot. If we go by these elements, we consider the story a proper one and disagree with the aunt’s conclusion that it is an improper story. 3

When it comes to the question of morality, we see that the bachelor gives the clear message that goodness gets punished. The question is whether it is advisable to give such a message to children. Here again, there are three points to be borne in mind. First of all, in life too not always does good get rewarded.

So, we can take it as the bachelor coming up with a realistic story. Secondly, we see that the bachelor in a subtle manner shows that the girl who is good, is good in a deliberate manner. She lacks the spontaneity and sincerity of children. Maybe the bachelor is giving a moral of a different kind. People who are too conscious of being good are not genuine.

Thirdly, the bachelor must have had the sensitivity of knowing that not all children could be expected to be good like Bertha. Such children are unnecessarily made to feel pathetic about not being good. So the bachelor must have wanted to make the children feel better about their own inadequacy. Going by all these reasons, we can conclude that though the story seems to be morally inappropriate at the first glance, a deeper analysis of the story shows that it has its own positive elements.

Question 3.
What elements in the bachelor’s story appealed to the children?
Answer:
The descriptive element, the unexpected twist, convincing answers to the questions raised in the course of the story made the children conclude that it was the best story that they had ever heard.

Question 4.
How would the story have ended if Bertha had not pinned the medals on her pinafore?
Answer:
The wolf would have gone away without spotting Bertha and would have probably satiated its hunger by eating a piglet.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
Which were the two parties travelling by train?
Answer:
One consisted of a small girl, a smaller girl, a small boy, and their aunt. The other was a bachelor.

 

Question 2.
What was the name of the boy?
Answer:
Cyril.

Question 3.
How did the boy produce a cloud of dust?
Answer:
By smacking the cushions of the seat.

Question 4.
Why were the sheep being driven out of the field, according to the aunt?
Answer:
The aunt said that the sheep were being driven to a field where there was more grass.

Question 5.
Why was the bachelor frowning?
Answer:
He was irritated by the noise made by the children and the fact that the aunt was unable to control them.

Question 6.
Why did the aunt call the children to listen to a story?
Answer:
The bachelor was annoyed and he stared at the aunt twice and at the communication cord once. It suggested that he was planning to pull it. So, the aunt wanted to pacify the children by telling them a story.

Question 7.
What made the bachelor think that the aunt did not rank high as a storyteller in the children’s view?
Answer:
When the aunt offered to tell a story to the children, the children moved reluctantly towards her. They did not seem to be much interested in her story. So, the bachelor thought that the aunt’s reputation did not rank high in the children’s view.

Question 8.
What was the opinion of the children about the story told by the aunt?
Answer:
The bigger girl opined that it was the stupidest story she had ever heard. The boy said that he never listened to the story after the first half because it was so stupid. The smaller girl seemed to have stopped listening to the story long back, as she had started reciting her favourite line.

Question 9.
What prompted the bachelor to tell the children a story?
Answer:
After listening to the story of the aunt, the children expressed their displeasure about it. Seeing this reaction the bachelor expressed that perhaps the aunt was not as successful as a storyteller. Hearing this comment, the aunt replied that it was not easy to tell a story that children could both understand and appreciate. The bachelor did not agree and he was challenged by the aunt to tell the children a story. The bachelor took up the challenge and started telling a story.

Question 10.
What were the good qualities of Bertha as noted by the bachelor?
Answer:
Bertha was an extraordinarily good girl. She did all that she was told, she was always truthful, she kept her clothes clean, ate milk puddings as though they were jam tarts, learned her lessons perfectly and was polite in her manners.

 

Question 11.
How was Bertha rewarded for her goodness?
Answer:
Bertha was so good that she won several medals for her goodness. There were medals for obedience, for good behavior and for punctuality. Ultimately, when news spread and the Prince of the country heard about it, he even allowed her to walk in his beautiful park once a week. This was an opportunity which no other child got.

Question 12.
How did the bachelor describe the park?
Answer:
It was a beautiful park. There were no flowers in the park but there were lots of pigs running all over. They were of different colours. There were ponds with colourful fish in them. The fish were gold, blue and green coloured. The trees were full of birds such as the hummingbird which hummed the popular tunes of the day and the beautiful parrots that said clever things at a moment’s notice.

Question 13.
What was the opinion of the children about the bachelor’s story?
Answer:
The children liked the story very much. They were immensely happy to hear it. The smaller of the girls said that though the story began badly, it had a beautiful ending. The bigger of the girls said that it was the most beautiful story that she had ever heard. Cyril said that it was the only beautiful story he had ever heard.

Question 14.
Why did the aunt consider the bachelor’s story as improper?
Answer:
The aunt reckoned that the story would damage the careful upbringing, particularly where values were concerned. The aunt had tried to teach values to the children all these years.

This would be undermined by the story told by the bachelor. So, the aunt considered it an improper story to be told to children.

Question 15.
What were the thoughts of the bachelor as he walked down the platform?
Answer:
As he walked down the platform the bachelor thought that the children would attack and pester their aunt with demands of an improper story for at least another six months.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
Nearly all of the children’s remarks began with
A) Do not
B) Yes
C) No
D) Why?
Answer:
D) Why?

Question 2.
The aunt decided that the bachelor was a hard, unsympathetic man when
A) the frown on the bachelor’s face turned into a scowl.
B) Cyril asked why the grass in the other field was better.
C) she could not find a satisfactory answer for Cyril’s question.
D) she tried to divert Cyril’s attention.
Answer:
A) the frown on the bachelor’s face turned into a scowl.

 

Question 3.
The line, the smaller girl went on repeating over and over again, was
A) Jack and Jill went up the hill
B) On the road to Mandalay
C) Pussy cat pussy cat where have you been
D) Twinkle twinkle little star.
Answer:
B) On the road to Mandalay

Question 4.
The aunt decided to tell the children a story when
A) the bachelor asked her to keep them quiet
B) Cyril asked her to tell a story
C) the bachelor looked at the communication cord
D) the smaller girl did not stop her singing.
Answer:
C) the bachelor looked at the communication cord

Question 5.
The children did not show interest in the aunt’s story because it was
A) very interesting
B) about a good girl
C) full of novelty
D) uninteresting and unenterprising.
Answer:
D) uninteresting and unenterprising.

Language Activities:

A) Vocabulary:

V1. Match the words in column ‘A’ with their meaning in column ‘B’:

A B
1. banish a) the place where a person lives
2. humble b) turn quickly
3. domicile c) stinking
4. foul-smelling d) expel
5. predator e) modest
6. flip f) an animal that hunts, kills and eats other animals
Answer:

d
e
a
c
f
b
V2. Which of the following expressions is correct?

a flock of birds/aflight of birds.
a flight of birds.
a swarm of insects/a colony of insects.
a swarm of insects.
a herd of goats/a flock of goats.
a herd of goats.
a troupe of actors/a company of actors.
a troupe of actors.
a wad of banknotes/a roll of banknotes.
a wad of banknotes.
a pack of cards / a deck of cards.
a deck of cards.
a team of experts/a panel of experts.
a panel of experts.
a bunch of grapes / a cluster of grapes.
a bunch of grapes.
V3. Write the synonyms and antonyms for the following words:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 8 Ethics 1

Word Synonyms Antonyms
1. calm quiet, rest, peace violence, unrest, struggle
2. ignore neglect, carelessness, slackness, disregard care, heed, solicitude, notice
3. gentle moderate, sobriety, mild rough
4. curious interested, inquisitive uninterested, indifferent
5. humble humility, modest, timid, unobtrusive conceited, vain, arrogant
6. revive renovate, restore, renew, regenerate, refresh weaken, replace, return
7. encounter arrive, confront, conflict, clash, meet depart, rebuff
8. pleasant agreeable, amusing, pleasing, enjoyable painful, unpleasant
9. deter discourage, hinder, remonstrate encourage, prompt, instigate
10. warm hot, welcoming, cordial, earnest cold, reticent, indifferent
11. dignified reputed, honor, stately disreputed, undignified
12. charming pleasing, beautiful, delightful displeasing, ugly, unattractive
B) Grammar And Usage:

G1. Read the following table carefully and match the details given in column A with the details given in Columns B, and C. One is done for you.

No. A B C
Statement Tense form Time reference
1. Every day, I study for six hours. Past Future
2. Meet me tomorrow. Present Future
3. The train arrives on platform No. 4 in a few minutes. Past Present – up to now
4. My aunt is visiting us next Sunday. So, I cannot join you for the next party. Present Future – up to then
5. We are going to buy a new car. Present Past (Single event)
6. I have finished my homework. Present Past
7. I had finished my homework by the time my friend came.
So, my father allowed me to go with him. Present Present, past and future (all time)
8. Sushma won the first prize in the recitation competition. Present Future
Answer:

No. A B C
Statement Tense Time
1. Every day, I study for six hours. Present Present, Future
2. Meet me tomorrow. Present Future
3. The train arrives on platform No. 4 in a few minutes. Present Future
4. My aunt is visiting us next Sunday. So, I cannot join you for the next party. Present Future – up to then
5. We are going to buy a new car. Present Future
6. I have finished my homework. Present Present – up to now
7. I had finished my homework by the time my friend came.
So, my father allowed me to go with him. Past Past
8. Sushma won the first prize in the recitation competition. Present Past (Single event)
G2. a) Fill in the blanks with suitable forms of the verbs given in brackets:

I am Shankar. I am an English teacher. I ………… (work) in Sarvodaya High School in Jayanagar. Every day, I ………….. (go) to Bangalore by train. The train is at 6 O’clock. So, I ………… (get) up at 4:30 a.m. and leave home around 5:30 a.m. My friend, Suresh, …………. (join) me on the way to the railway station. He is also a teacher. He …………. (teach) Biology. The train ……………. (reach) Bangalore around 8:30 a.m. We ………….. (take) a
B.M.T.C. bus from the railway station to Jayanagar.
Answer:
I am Shankar. I am an English teacher. I work in Sarvodaya High School in Jayanagar. Every day, I go to Bangalore by train. The train is at 6 O’clock. So, I get up at 4:30 a.m. and leave home around 5:30 a.m. My friend, Suresh, joins me on the way to the railway station. He is also a teacher. He teaches Biology. The train reaches Bangalore around 8:30 a.m. We take a B.M.T.C. bus from the railway station to Jayanagar.

 

b) Construct sentences using the appropriate tense form of the verbs underlined in each.

Everyday Yesterday
1. Go to school Go to Vijayapura to attend a friend’s marriage
2. Evening – practice music Evening – visit Golgumbaz
3. Help her brother with his homework. Go to a movie
Every week Last week
4. Visit her grandmother Spend time with relatives
5. Thursday – go swimming Thursday – attend a music concert
Answer:

Lakshmi goes to school every day, but yesterday she went to Vijayapura to attend her friend’s marriage.
Susheel practices music every day, but yesterday he visited Golgumbaz.
Bharathi helps her brother in his homework every day, but yesterday she went for a movie.
Kanthi visits her grandmother every week, but last week she spent time with her relatives.
Every week, on Thursday, Shantha goes swimming; but last Thursday, she attended a music concert.
G3. Complete the following conversation using the correct form of the verbs given in brackets:

Dhaman: Good morning, Mr. Salunke. I am from Suyama Karnataka’s newspaper. I _______ (write) an article on the lifestyle of wrestlers. Can I trouble you tomorrow for an interview?
Salunke: I _______ (be) afraid I will not be free tomorrow. I ______ (go) to Hyderabad to attend a conference. I ______ (back) day after tomorrow.
Dhaman: Oh! I am to submit my article the day after tomorrow. Do you _______ (think) you can spare a few minutes now?
Salunke: Umm! Well, I think I can _______ (spare) five minutes for you now.
Dhaman: Thank you very much. Tell me how you _______ (prepare) yourself for the wrestling competition.
Salunke: Everyday, I ______ (get) up very early in the morning. I _______ (spend) nearly six hours in the gymnasium. But my friend Raghu ______ (spend) only two hours in the gym. Our trainer ________ (train) us rigorously.
Dhaman: What diet _______ you _______ (follow) ?
Salunke: I ______ (prefer) lots of cereals and greens. But Raghu _______ (prefer) non-vegetarian diet.
Answer:

Dhaman: Good morning, Mr. Salunke. I am from ‘Suvarna Karnataka’s newspaper. I am writing an article on the lifestyle of wrestlers. Can I trouble you tomorrow for an interview?
Salunke: I am afraid I will not be free tomorrow. I am going to Hyderabad to attend the conference. I will be back the day after tomorrow.
Dhaman: Oh! I am to submit my article the day after tomorrow. Do you think you can spare a few minutes now?
Salunke: Umm! Well, I think I can spare five minutes for you now.
Dhaman: Thank you very much. Tell me how you are preparing yourself for the wrestling competition.
Salunke: Every day I get up very early in the morning. I spend nearly six hours in the gymnasium. But my friend Raghu spends only two hours in the gym. Our trainer trains us rigorously.
Dhaman: What diet do you follow?
Salunke: I prefer lots of cereals and greens. But Raghu prefers a non-vegetarian diet.
G4. Give reasons for the following. Use the verbs given in brackets. The first one is done for you:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 8 Ethics 2
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 8 Ethics 3
Answer:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 8 Ethics 4

G5. Past Tense:

Rewrite the following by filling in the blanks with the past form of the verbs given in brackets. (You may have to use the past simple, past progressive and past perfect):

1. The children …………… (make) a lot of noise which ………….. (disturb) the bachelor. The little girl ……….. (sing) the first line of a poem repeatedly. Cyril ………… (smack) the cushions of the seat. When the aunt …………… (ask) him to look out of the window, he ………….. (start) asking questions about the sheep that ………….. (be) in the field. The aunt…… (try) to calm down the children by telling them a story. But the children did not like her narration.
The bachelor …………. (decide) to tell them a story. His style of narration ………….. (appeal) to the imagination of the children.
They ………….. (listen) to the story with rapt attention and ……………… (enjoy) the story.
Answer:
The children were making a lot of noise which disturbed the bachelor. The little girl was singing the first line of a poem repeatedly. Cyril was smacking the cushions of the seat. When the aunt asked him to look out of the window, he started asking questions about the sheep that were in the field. The aunt tried to calm down the children by telling them a story. But the children did not like her narration. The bachelor decided to tell them a story. His style of narration appealed to the imagination of the children. They listened to the story with rapt attention and enjoyed the story.

 

2. When I came home, my sister ……………… (work) on the computer. When I came home, my sister was working on the computer.
3. While Suresh ………….. (read) the text, Sony ………….. (note down) the main points.
While Suresh was reading the text, Sony noted down the main points.
4. The phone ……………. (ring) while I ………….. (have) my dinner. The phone rang while I was having my dinner.

Ethics by Saki About The Author:

Hector Hugo Munro (1870-1916), whose pen name is Saki, was a British writer. His stories are generally witty, mischievous, and sometimes very grim. He is compared to O. Henry and Dorothy Parker for his short stories. He is considered a master of the short story. He was influenced by writers like Lewis Carroll, Rudyard Kipling and Oscar Wilde, in turn, he also influenced many other writers of younger generations. The present story depicts something different from the usual stories told to children.

Ethics Summary in English
The short story ‘The Story-Teller’ by H.H. Munro is set in a train. We get introduced to a family of four, comprising an aunt with her two nieces and a nephew. The only other occupant is a bachelor. The story humorously refers to the difficulty of the aunt in keeping the children occupied and in ensuring that they do not disturb the other passengers. She is unable to answer their questions convincingly and hence, offers to narrate a story. But, even as a storyteller she fails as the children bombard her with questions.

It is at this point that the bachelor observes aloud that the aunt did not seem to be a good storyteller. The aunt retorts that it is difficult to narrate stories that are both understandable and entertaining to children. She also challenges the stranger to come up with an effective story.

The bachelor accepts the challenge and begins with a story. Though the story has the conventional beginning of a good girl named Bertha, it catches the attention of the children when the bachelor, while answering a question, remarks that the girl is not as pretty as the little girls in the compartment. He further amuses them by describing the girl as being horribly good. Never had the children come across an oxymoron such as ‘horribly good’.

The bachelor tells the children that the Prince of the country honours Bertha for being good by permitting her to walk in his park once a week. When the children want to know whether there are sheep in the park and are answered in the negative, they want to know the reason. The aunt is secretly happy thinking that the bachelor too would find it impossible to answer the ‘why’ questions.

But the bachelor exhibits his power of imagination by saying that there are no sheep or clock as the prince’s mother had a dream that the prince would meet his end because of a sheep or a clock. When the tricky question is asked whether the prince actually died because of either of the two, the bachelor uses his wit to avoid an inappropriate answer by saying that the prince is still alive and hence the question cannot be answered.

The bachelor exhibits his power of description while talking about the pigs, the fish and the wolf. The bachelor perhaps appeals to the children because he makes fun of Bertha in a subtle manner. We see that Bertha is elated at the opportunity of being in the park, but is disappointed that she cannot give further proof of her goodness by not touching the flowers in the park as there are no flowers.

The bachelor explains the absence of flowers by adding that the pigs in the park had eaten them all. The bachelor’s explanation that the prince had chosen pigs over flowers amuses the children as it is an unusual choice. The bachelor also gives an unexpected twist to the story by showing that Bertha meets with a tragic end because of her goodness.

A wolf comes to the park and spots Bertha because of her pinafore which is spotlessly white and is able to locate her in the thick bushes because of the sound made by the three medals that she had won for obedience, good conduct, and punctuality. The good girl’s reward for good turns out to be the cause of her death.

The story, which is termed improper by the aunt, is highly appreciated by the children. The bachelor wryly responds to the aunt by saying that he was at least able to keep the children occupied for ten minutes. The chosen piece does not explicitly answer the question of whether children need to be given morality in the form of stories- or whether it is acceptable for stories to uphold the value of entertainment alone. However, the piece clearly shows that storytelling is an art and children cannot be given silly answers to the questions that they raise.

Glossary:

sultry: uncomfortably warm
persistent: doing something continuously
smack: to hit forcefully
reluctant: unwilling
fatuous: stupid
frown: facial expression showing annoyance
scowl: a very annoyed expression
wager: bet
listlessly: unwillingly
petulant: ill-tempered
retort: angry reply
flicker: begin to go down
grin: to smile widely
pinafore: loose garment without sleeves, worn over clothes to keep them clean
leaps and bounds: very quickly
shrubbery: undergrowth
sniff out: recognize by smelling
dissentient: differing from the opinion of the majority
undermined: damaged.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

9th English Medium. English The Collectors

Chapter. The Collectors

English Chapter The Collectors.

C1. Answer the following:

Question 1.
Why was the group looking for shelter?
Answer:
The group was looking for a shelter because it suddenly started raining heavily. When they were out for an adventure walk.

Question 2.
How far was the village from the place the group was living in?
Answer:
The village was three miles from the place the group was living in.

Question 3.
Why did Mr. Hunt hesitate to seek shelter in the house?
Answer:
Mr. Hunt hesitated to take shelter in the house because it was in a lonely place and it wasn’t there the previous time he had walked there. He also felt that since all of them were dripping wet, it was not decent to go into somebody’s house.

 

Question 4.
Name the occupants of the house.
Answer:
The occupants of the house were Mr. and Mrs. Brown.

Question 5.
On what pretext did the occupants of the house separate the teachers from the children?
Answer:
The occupants of the house asked the children to sit in the kitchen and asked the teachers to sit in the living room. They separated them saying that there was not enough place in the living room for all to sit.

Question 6.
What seemed unnatural in the house to the children?
Answer:
The children felt that the house was very unnatural because the kitchen looked very empty. There were no plates, pots, or pans. The cupboards were empty and the fridge was also empty.

Question 7.
What was unnatural with Mrs. Brown’s hand?
Answer:
Mrs. Brown had seven fingers on both hands.

Question 8.
What did the children find in the larger cupboard?
Answer:
The children found a lot of electronic equipment in the larger cupboard. There were dials, digital read-outs, coloured lights, and a mass of other electronic equipment.

Question 9.
When Pete went to Mr. Hunt, Mr. Hunt was not moving and was staring blankly because –
a) he was thinking
b) he was drugged
c) he was meditating.
Answer:
(b) He was drugged.

 

Question 10.
When Pete went to Mr. Hunt, Pete heard the Browns talking to each other but could not understand what they were saying. Why?
Answer:
Pete could not understand what the Browns were talking to each other because they were not humans and were talking in an alien language.

Question 11.
Why did Pete prevent the other children from taking the drink?
Answer:
Pete prevented the other children from taking the orange juice because he suspected that it must have been drugged like the tea which his teachers had drunk.

Question 12.
Where were the aliens taking the children?
Answer:
The aliens were taking the children to their home planet.

Question 13.
Why were the aliens collecting creatures from other planets?
Answer:
The aliens were collecting creatures from other planets for experiments and scientific study.

Question 14.
Where was the control of the back door located?
Answer:
The control of the backdoor was located on the left of the panel in the large cupboard. It was marked with a yellow light.

Question 15.
After sending all the others out of the spaceship, how did Pete and Glenn manage to escape from the aliens?
Answer:
Pete ordered Mrs. and Mr. Brown to go through the door behind them and close it. He threatened to smash the equipment if they didn’t obey him. When they went out, he and Glenn escaped through the back door.

C2. Answer the following:

Question 1.
What circumstances forced the party to take shelter in the spaceship?
Answer:
The six children and their three teachers were out for an adventure walk. Suddenly it started raining heavily and as the village was three miles away, they decided to take shelter in a house they saw in the countryside. They were not aware that the house was in fact a spaceship.

Question 2.
List the things that made the children feel uncomfortable in the kitchen.
Answer:

The kitchen is like a hospital.
No plates, no pots, and pans.
The cupboard is quite empty.
The fridge is also empty.
Question 3.
Why couldn’t the children escape through either the back door or the windows?
Answer:
The children tried breaking the backdoor and the window but could not do so. They hit the door with the walking stick but it didn’t break. They realised that the glass was unbreakable. Hence they couldn’t open either the door or the window and escape. In fact, the controls for opening the door and window were in the electronic panel in the big cupboard.

 

Question 4.
List the following:

Things that were in the kitchen.
Unusual features of the Browns.
Language used by the Browns.
Different ways in which the children tried to get out of the house.
Answer:

Things that were in the kitchen: An empty cupboard and a fridge that was not working.
Unusual features of the Browns: Mrs. Brown had seven fingers on both the hands, their eyes were all one colour, they didn’t have any black-sort-of-centers.
Language used by the Browns: Alien language, that sounded like hissing and clicking.
Different ways children tried to get out of the house: The children tried to open the back door, tried to smash the window open with a stick. Finally, they got out by threatening Mrs. Brown.
C3. Answer the following:

Question 1.
What suspicion did the children have about the Browns and their ‘house’? What convincing reasons did Mrs. Brown come up with?
Answer:
When the children were left in the kitchen, they found it very odd that there was nothing in the kitchen no pots, pans, or plates, the cupboards were empty, the fridge was empty and disconnected.

They saw that Mrs. Brown looked very odd with seven fingers in each hand, her eyes all in one colour. They heard the Browns talking to one another in a hissing and clicking tone. The children who thought till then that the Browns were thieves, realized that they were in fact aliens. They were sure of it when they found a large mass of electronic equipment in a cupboard and the doors and windows locked and unbreakable.

When the children questioned Mrs. Brown about the empty kitchen, she said that nothing was stocked since they had just moved in. When the children asked her about the electronic panel in the cupboard, she said that her husband was a scientist and it was a part of his work. The doors and windows were burglar proof and autoclosing because they did not want their expensive equipment to be stolen.

Question 2.
How did Pete become instrumental in saving the teachers and his mates?
Answer:
Pete outsmarted the aliens. He was the first one to understand that Mrs. and Mr. Brown had drugged the teachers. He immediately grew cautious and kept the walking stick with him for possible confrontations with the Browns. He also cautioned the children not to drink the orange juice. Once the Browns came to know that they could no longer deceive the children, they let out the secret that they were aliens. They also told the children that they would be used in experiments. However, Pete’s presence of mind saved them.

He had seen the equipment being stored in the cupboard and knew that the aliens needed it badly. So he stood at the cupboard with the walking stick held high threateningly and told the aliens that if they made any wrong move, he would smash the equipment in the cupboard.

He took the help of Wayne in controlling the aliens. He asked Wayne to be ready with a chair to spoil everything in the cupboard if the aliens disobeyed his orders. He made Mr. Brown lead the teachers back to the room where the children were and dominated over Mrs. Brown to know how to open the back door.

Once all, except Wayne and he, had escaped through the back door, he ordered the aliens to go out of the other door and close it behind them. After they went out of the door, he ran out with Wayne and escaped being abducted by the aliens. Thus, Pete had the clarity of thought even in crisis and saved not only himself but also all his friends and teachers.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
Where did Mr. Hunt keep his walking stick, once inside the house?
Answer:
He hung it on the back of a chair.

Question 2.
What drink did Mrs. Brown offer the children?
Answer:
Orange juice.

Question 3.
How did Mrs. Brown appear to the children?
Answer:
Something weird like a vampire.

Question 4.
What did the children try doing in order to get out?
Answer:
They tried to open the back door as well as the window but they were unsuccessful.

 

Question 5.
Why wouldn’t the police be able to find them?
Answer:
The aliens planned to leave the place along with the teachers and the children. Once their spaceship left, there would be no trace left. So, the police would not be able to find them.

Question 6.
How did Pete keep Mr. and Mrs. Brown away?
Answer:
By threatening to smash their electronic equipment if they moved nearer.

Question 7.
Why was Mrs. Brown afraid of attacking the children?
Answer:
She did not want to be stranded on Earth. If any part of their equipment broke, they had no chance of repairing it.

Question 8.
Where was the house after all of them got out?
Answer:
It had vanished in a soundless flash.

Question 9.
Where did the teachers and children go after their strange experience?
Answer:
Towards the village.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
In the play ‘The Collectors’, a group of teachers and children went out for
A) a picnic
B) an excursion
C) a visit to a historical place
D) an adventure walk.
Answer:
D) an adventure walk.

Question 2.
The group decided to take shelter in a lonely house because
A) it was raining hard
B) they were tired of walking
C) they were hungry
D) it was dark.
Answer:
A) it was raining hard

 

Question 3.
The children found the kitchen unusual because there were
A) no pots, pans or plates
B) no windows
C) no cupboards
D) no vegetables
Answer:
A) no pots, pans or plates

Question 4.
The group did not want to go to the village because
A) they did not want to walk nearly three miles in the rain
B) the Browns invited them to their house
C) Mr. Hunt knew the Browns
D) it was night already.
Answer:
A) they did not want to walk nearly three miles in the rain

Question 5.
Mrs. Brown warned the children
A) not to touch the cupboards
B) not to play in the kitchen
C) not to go out
D) not to open the fridge.
Answer:
A) not to touch the cupboards

Question 6.
Pete went into the sitting room to talk to Mr. Hunt. But he found Mr. Hunt
A) sleeping soundly
B) staring blankly at nothing
C) talking to the other teachers
D) talking to the Browns
Answer:
B) staring blankly at nothing

Question 7.
Mrs. Brown said that the back door and the windows were locked because
A) Mr. Brown did not want his equipment stolen.
B) they did not want anybody to come in.
C) they did not want to be seen by anyone.
D) they were hiding from the police.
Answer:
A) Mr. Brown did not want his equipment stolen.

 

Question 8.
The kitchen reminded Pete of a
A) school
B) theatre
C) hospital
D) laboratory
Answer:
C) hospital

Language Activities:

A. Vocabulary:

V1. a) Look at the following describing words and phrases. Group them under words or phrases describing the place and describing the Browns. Write two different paragraphs describing the place and describing the Browns.

Terribly quiet, aliens, had seven fingers, eyes had no centre, weird, weird like a vampire, cold, strange, spoke strange language, deserted, empty.
Words describing the place Words describing the Browns
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 2 The Collectors 1
Answer:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 2 The Collectors 2

Paragraphs:

The place was terribly quiet. It was cold inside and appeared strange. It was in a totally deserted place. Every cupboard in the kitchen was empty and it all felt weird.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown were aliens. They spoke a strange language. Their eyes did not have any black centres. Mrs. Brown had seven fingers on each of her hands and the children felt that she was weird like a vampire.
b) Synonyms of the word ‘wet’.
drenched, dripping, drizzling, foggy, humid, misty, soaked, sodden.
Write the meaning of each word, and see how they differ in their meaning. Write a sentence each for every word.

drenched: To make someone or something completely wet. As he was completely drenched, he decided to skip classes.
dripping: make something fall in drips.
Since she did not dry her hair, water was dripping from her plait.
drizzling: light rain.
Since it is drizzling, the match has to be cancelled.
foggy: a thick cloud of very small drops of water in the air close to the land.
Mr. Bhat couldn’t reach the airport in time as the traffic was moving slowly owing to fog.
humid: containing extremely small drops of water in the air.
Since our city is humid during summer, tourists find the stay uncomfortable.
misty: full of or covered with mist.
The misty weather added an aura of mystery to the lonely place.
soaked: completely wet.
The maid soaked the clothes in hot water to remove the stains.
sodden: extremely wet.
Since his footwear was sodden, he couldn’t run fast.
V2. a) Prefix:

Prefix is an ‘addition’ to the ‘beginning’ of a word which changes its form and meaning. Below are some examples of prefixes. You add some more (at least three each) to them.

Prefix Meaning Example More examples
bi- two, twice bicycle
CO – together, with co-operate
multi – many multipurpose
mono – pre – single
before monosyllable
pre-school
re – again rewrite
post – after, later postpone
il-, im-, in-, ir-, non-, un-, mis-, dis- not (antonyms of the words) illiterate, impossible, inactive, irresponsible, nonviolence, unlock
over – too much overeat
semi – half semicircle
under – not enough underweight
More examples:

bi – bifocal; biannual; bicycle; biweekly.
co – co-ordinate; co-curriculum; co-passenger; co-existence; co-education; co-habitation; co-incidence; co-worker.
multi – multi-functional; multi-faceted; multi-media; multi-coloured; multi-lingual; multi-national.
mono – monograph; monotone; monolith; monopoly; monorail.
pre – pre-determine; pre-arrange; preface; pre-cast; preview; prefix.
re – regain; redo; return; reunite; rediscover; react; reassure; rebound; recall; recap.
post – post-operation; post-natal; post-script; post-mortem; post-war; post-graduate.
il – illegitimate; illegal; illness; illiterate; illogical.
im – imperfect; imbalance; impossible; immeasurable.
in- inability; incomplete; inaccurate; indefinite; incorrect; inevitable; inappropriate.
ir – irregular; irrational; irrecoverable; irredeemable; irrelevant; irresponsible.
non- non-cooperation; non-existent; non-entity; non-interference; nonsense; non-stick.
un- uneventful; undone; unwanted; unfinished; unknown; unlike; unquestionable; unreasonable.
mis – misconduct; mislead; mismanage; misunderstand; misuse; misfire; mistake.
dis – disqualify; dislocate; displease; disappear; disgrace; dislike; disagree; disorder.
over- overreact; overconfident; overjoyed; overwork; overdue; overeat; overdo.
semi – semi-conductor; semi-conscious; semi-final; semi-circle.
under – underage; undergraduate; underestimate; underprivileged; underline; underweight.
b) Suffix:

Suffix is an addition to the end of a word which changes its form and meaning. Suffixes are mainly used to make nouns, adjectives, adverbs, antonyms and verbs.

1. The table shows some examples for the same. You add some more in the last column.

Suffix Examples
More examples

-er, -or, -ist, -ee teacher, editor, tourist, employee
-ance, -ence, -ism, -dom, -ity, -ty, -ship performance, existence, patriotism, kingdom, possibility, cruelty, hardship
-al, -en, -ful, -ly, -less, -ous national, golden, joyful, friendly, fearless, nervous
-en, -ise (or) -ize broaden, nationalise, modernize
-ly quickly, boldly
More Examples:

-er – preacher, examiner, prayer, cheater, reader.
-or – monitor, evaluator, sailor, conqueror.
-ist – motorist, guitarist, dentist.
-ee – payee, interviewee, addressee, employee.
-ance – accordance, attendance, tolerance.
-ence – preference, difference, existence.
-ism – tourism, absenteeism, criticism.
-dom – freedom, boredom, martyrdom.
-ity – probability, morality, capability, density.
-ty – nutty, potty, dotty, fatty.
-ship – kinship, statesmanship, friendship.
-al – emotional, seasonal, arrival, optional.
-en – broken, spoken, shaken.
-ful – playful, painful, careful, helpful.
-ly – quietly, mostly, lastly.
-less – jobless, cashless, pointless.
-ous – joyous, adventurous, disastrous, poisonous.
-en – lengthen, strengthen, soften, shorten.
-ise or -ize – internalise, patronise, centralise, characterise.
-ly – sharply, narrowly, primarily.

2. Form new words using the appropriate prefixes or suffixes:
Example: safe – unsafe, safely, safety.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 2 The Collectors 3
New words:

Coloured – colourful, colourless, colourfully, discolour.
Absent – absence, absentminded, absenteeism, absentee.
Rest – restful, restless, restive, resting, unrest.
Cycle – cyclic, cyclical, cyclist, bicycle.
Kind – kindly, kindness, unkind, unkindly.
Question – questionable, questionably, questioning, questionnaire, unquestionable.
Wise – wisely, wisdom, unwise, unwisely.
Solid – solidify, solidly, solidity, solidness.
Loyal – loyally, loyalty, disloyal, disloyally.
Lock – unlock, locker, locking, locked.
Normal – normally, normalcy, normality, abnormal, abnormally.
Sufficient – suffice, insufficient, sufficiently, sufficiency.
Direct – direction, director, directly, directionless.
Noble – nobility, ignoble, nobly, nobleness.
Move – movable, movably, immovable, moving, movement, mover, remove, remover, removable, removability, unmoved, moved.
Wool – woolly, woollen.
Culture – culturally, cultural, cultureless, uncultured, cultured.
Wind – windy, windless, unwind, winding, windmill, windfall, winded.
Treat – treatment, treaty, entreat.
Fear – fearless, fearful, fearlessly, fearfully, fearsome.
B. Grammar And Usage:

I. First conditionals (possible)

G1. Match the following Main clauses and ‘if’ clauses:

‘If’ clause Main clause
1. If you wastewater
2. If you lend me some money
3. If Ravi is late
4. If the bus breaks down
5. If it rains a. he will be punished
b. I won’t be able to attend the class
c. I shall get wet
d. I can buy a new car
e. you will suffer
Answer:

e
d
a
b
c
II. Second conditionals (probable):

G2. A. Use the words provided and rewrite the sentences using ‘if’ clauses:

Tajmahal/Chaya/Agra/visit
If Chaya had visited Agra, she would have visited Tajmahal.
rained/the plants/not wither
If it rained, the plants wouldn’t wither.
had/P ay alan/new shoes/jog faster
If Payalan had new shoes, he would jog faster.
had/Kalai/a cycle/reach school earlier.
If Kalai had a cycle, he would reach school earlier.
B. Match the phrases in Column A with those in Column B:

A B
If he studied well a) I would buy a BMW car
If he went late b) he would pass the exam
If I won a lottery c) the dog would bite us
If it got out of the gate d) he would not get water
If I had more money e) I would feed a lot of people
Answer:

b
d
a
c
e
III. Third conditionals:

G3. Exercise:

Complete the following sentences with suitable clauses given in the box below:

If Raj had got enough water, ……………..
Prajwal would have found a job, ………………
If Ramya hadn’t started early, ………………
Christopher would have got a prize, ……………….
If we had saved more rain water in ponds and lakes, …………………
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 2 The Collectors 4
Answer:

If Raj had got enough water, he would have shared it with his neighbour.
Prajwal would have found a job, if he had attended the interview.
If Ramya hadn’t started early, she would have been late to work.
Christopher would have got a prize, if he had performed . well.
If we had saved more rain water in ponds and lakes, we could have survived the drought.
Listening And Speaking:

L2. What/ how would you suggest in the following situations?

Your friend’s eyes are red and watering, (……………. go to a doctor)
Your neighbour is suffering from toothache. ( ………….. I would go to the dentist.)
Ramesh wants to improve his English. ( ……………….. join a crash course)
The local MLA wants to meet your H.M. but the H.M. is away for a meeting. (……………… come tomorrow)
Salim wants to buy a dictionary but has no money. (……………… borrow from the library.)
Answer:

Your friend’s eyes are red and watering. Why don’t you go to the doctor?
Your neighbour is suffering from toothache. If I were you, I would go to the dentist.
Ramesh wants to improve his English. I think you should join a crash course.
Local MLA wants to meet your H.M., but the H.M. is away for a meeting. Excuse me, sir, I am afraid you will have to come tomorrow.
Salim wants to buy a dictionary but has no money. How about borrowing one from the library?
The Collectors Summary in English
‘The Collectors’ is a one-act play about the encounter of a group of teachers and children on an adventure walk in a lonely countryside with two aliens. The aliens have taken the form of humans and hence the group takes shelter in their spaceship mistaking it for a house.

It’s raining heavily and Miss Swann wonders whether they could get shelter. But Mr. Hunt replies that they could get a shelter only after reaching the village which is three miles away. It is at this point that the group sees a house. The strangeness of the house is apparent right from the beginning.

Mrs. Jones says that it is funny-looking. Mr. Hunt remarks that it wasn’t there when he had been there the previous summer. However, since the children are wet and cold, they decide to approach the house for shelter. They also think that if it is embarrassing to ask for shelter for so many of them, they would take shelter in the shed.

However, they are welcomed by the inmates of the house, Mrs. and Mr. Brown. The grown-ups are taken to the sitting room and they are also offered tea. But after the three teachers and the inmates of the house have gone to the sitting room, the children start feeling uncomfortable. They find the house to be strange as it is terribly quiet and cold, and there is no wind at all. They also find everything empty as though the house is not being used at all. The children wonder whether the Browns have put all their things in the cupboard.

But when they look into the cupboard, they find the cupboard empty. The fridge is not only empty but it is not switched on also. Even as Dawn and Tracy warn Wayne and Pete not to snoop around, Carol remarks that she finds the Browns strange. The children come to the conclusion that the Browns are crooks and the house is their hideout.

At this point, Mrs. Brown comes back and she finds the cupboard open. She warns the children not to mess around. She also offers the explanation that they are yet to open the packs and put things in their place as they had just moved into the new place. She even offers orange juice to the children and leaves the room, warning the children once again not to touch the cupboards.

However, the suspicion of the children grows. They even notice that she has seven fingers each on her two hands. They also find her eyes strange as they don’t seem to have the pupil. The children feel that it is better for them to leave the place and hence Pete goes to meet the teachers.

Wayne meanwhile grows curious about the second cupboard. Though Dawn and Tracy warn Wayne not to touch the cupboard, Wayne opens the cupboard and the children are surprised to see dials, digital read¬outs, coloured lights and electronic equipment in the cupboard.

At that point Pete returns and increases the discomfort of the children by sharing with them his doubt that the teachers were drugged. He reveals that the three teachers had sat motionless and the Browns were communicating with each other in a strange way, hissing and clicking at each other. The children, who are by now more and more uncomfortable, decide to get out of the house.

But Wayne finds the back door locked and there is no key. The same is true of the window also. They are not able to break it open with Mr. Hunt’s stick as the glass is like steel. Even as they decide to look for a way out through the front, Mrs. Brown returns with a tray of drinks. The children confront her directly and ask her what she has done to their teachers. She refutes the allegation that they have drugged the teachers.

When the children ask her about the strange things in the cupboard, she tells them that Mr. Brown is a scientist and it is his electronic equipment. She gives the explanation that the door and the window are burglar-proof. At this point Tracy blurts out that the children have found the house and the inmates to be strange.

Even as Mrs. Brown takes offence, Pete confronts her and asks her to take them to the sitting room. Mrs. Brown, in response, offers to get one of their teachers to where they are. Once again Tracy and Dawn believe Mrs. Brown and start blaming Pete for unnecessarily scaring them.

But Mrs. Brown returns with Mr. Brown instead of Mr. Hunt and Mr. Brown orders the. children to drink the juice. They refuse to do so, prompted by Pete. When Glen and Wayne try to escape, they are sent flying across the kitchen by Mrs. Brown. The children learn the truth one by one. When the children tell Mr. Brown that they cannot be kidnapped as the police would look for them, Mr. Brown tells them that they are aliens who have taken the human shape and the shelter that looked like a house would be converted to a spaceship when they are ready to take off.

He adds that the children can’t anyway escape and if they were to drink the juice, it would lessen the shock of the take-off of the spaceship. He also lets out the secret that children are collected for the sake of experiments and scientific study.

But just then the presence of mind of Pete saves the children and their teachers. He had seen the equipment being stored in the cupboard and knew that the aliens needed it badly. So he stands at the cupboard with the walking stick held high threateningly and tells the aliens that if they made any wrong move, he would smash the equipment in the cupboard. He takes the help of Wayne in controlling the aliens.

He asks Wayne to be ready with a chair to destroy everything in the cupboard if the aliens disobey his orders. He makes Mr. Brown lead the teachers to the room where the children are and dominates over Mrs. Brown and learns how to open the back door.

Once all, except Wayne and he, have escaped through the back door, he orders the aliens to go out of the other door and closes it behind them. After they go out of the door, he runs out with Wayne and escapes being abducted by the aliens. Thus, Pete has clarity of thought even in crisis and saves not only himself but also all his friends and teachers.

After a while the group is surprised to realise that it is neither raining nor foggy and the sun is out. The house itself is not there. It is as if they had imagined their encounter with the aliens. There is a difference of opinion about reporting the matter. Some like Tracy feel that nobody would believe them.

Some like Mr. Hunt feel that the matter should be reported especially since people have disappeared. He feels that there should be a warning. The play comes to an end even as the group continues to argue over the matter.

Glossary:

porch: covered entrance, portico
weird: strange, unusual
cheeky: disrespectful
snoop: poke around
stranded: trapped
anoraks: a waterproof jacket, typically with a hood, of a kind originally used in polar regions
potty: foolish, silly.

English Chapter The Collectors.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

Back To Home.

 

English Chapter The Collectors.

9th English Medium Chapter 1. The Best Advice I Ever Had

The Best Advice I Ever Had

Chapter1. The Best Advice I Ever Had

9th English Medium Chapter. 1 . The Best Advice I Ever Had.

                                                         -Vijayalakshmi Pandit

 

A. Identify the following great personalities:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had

The Best Advice I Ever Had Thumbnail
Answer:

 

Smt. Sarojini Naidu
Smt. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit
Smt. Indira Gandhi
Justice M. Fathima Beevi
Smt. Pratibha Patil
Smt. Kiran Bedi.
B. Now using the clues given in column ‘A’ write the names of the personalities in column ‘B’:
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had 2
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had 3
Answer:

Smt. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit
Justice M. Fathima Beevi
Smt. Kiran Bedi
Smt. Pratibha Patil
Smt. Indira Gandhi
Smt. Sarojini Naidu.
Comprehension:

C1. Based on your reading of the lesson, answer the following questions by choosing the most appropriate option:

Question 1.
Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi resented her galling position. The ‘galling position’ referred to here is
A) the death of her husband
B) her position as a widow without a son
C) she and her daughters not being entitled to any share of the family property
D) the hatred of her family members.
Answer:
C) she and her daughters not being entitled to any share of the family property

 

Question 2.
According to Gandhiji, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi could cleanse the bitterness of her heart by
A) making peace with her relatives
B) going out of the country for some time
C) asking excuse from her relatives
D) fighting for her rights.
Answer:
A) making peace with her relatives

Question 3.
Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi said, ‘I thought of the counsel that had calmed me so many times’. The counseling referred to here is
A) never hate anyone
B) no one can harm you but yourself
C) treating others in the same way
D) not to be revengeful.
Answer:
B) no one can harm you but yourself

C2. Discuss the answers for the following questions with your partner and then write them in your notebook:

Question 1.
Why was Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit in anguish?
Answer:
Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was in anguish because the turn of events made her lose her faith in humanity. She had recently lost her husband and the Indian law treated her as though she had no existence of her own. Since she had no sons, she was not entitled to any share of her husband’s property and her importance was measured only through her relation with her husband.

Question 2.
In paragraph 3, Mrs. Pandit speaks about ‘antiquated law’. What is referred to as antiquated law?
Answer:
The antiquated law refers to that aspect of the Indian law which treated a widow without sons as a non-entity. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was upset over the antiquated law which treated women so disrespectfully even though women had worked and suffered along with men in the national struggle for freedom as their equals.

 

Question 3.
Why was Mrs. Pandit going to America, according to Gandhiji?
Answer:
According to Gandhiji, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was going to America to escape reality. She was unhappy with her relatives and was going to a foreign country with bitterness in her heart. According to Gandhiji, this would cause further injury to her heart because she did not have the courage to cleanse her own heart.

Question 4.
What did Gandhiji want Mrs. Pandit to do before going abroad? What was Mrs. Pandit’s response to that?
Answer:
Gandhiji wanted Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit to cleanse her heart of anger and pride and make peace with her husband’s family before going abroad. However, Mrs. Pandit said that she did not want to do that even to please Gandhiji.

Question 5.
How did Gandhiji make Mrs. Pandit meet her relatives?
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhi advised Mrs. Pandit that no one can hurt one except oneself. Unless the bitterness in her heart was cleared, it would cause her injury. He asked her not to leave the country with bitterness, as happiness can’t be found outside when there is bitterness inside. He asked her to cleanse her heart and meet her relatives.

Question 6.
“Must you inflict further injury on yourself?”
(a) What is the injury referred to here?
(b) Why does Gandhiji ask Mrs. Pandit not to hurt herself?
Answer:
(a) The injury that she would cause to her heart by being angry with her relatives.
(b) Gandhiji knew that when one was angry with another, one caused hurt to one’s own self more than to anyone else.

Gandhiji did not want Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, who had already undergone the sorrow of losing her husband, to inflict her heart with more and more sorrow.

Question 7.
Why did Mrs. Pandit not meet her relatives in the beginning before she left for America?
Answer:
Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was embittered with her relatives who believed in an antiquated law and felt that as a woman without sons, she was not entitled to any share of her husband’s property.

Question 8.
“I lifted the debate back to where it belonged”. What was the debate about?
Answer:
As a leader of the Indian delegation to the United Nations, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit had to place before her opponents India’s complaint about the treatment of people of Indian origin in South Africa. Initially, when her opponents made personal attacks, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit hit back in the same manner. But once she remembered Gandhiji’s advice to her, she brought the debate back to where it belonged, refusing to retaliate to personal attacks and argued the case on its merits.

 

Question 9.
Mrs. Pandit recollected the advice of Gandhiji often. What was the advice?
Answer:
The advice was not to do anything that injures our self-respect and to be humble, and that no one can harm us except ourselves.

Question 10.
After visiting her relatives, Mrs. Pandit commented, I felt as if a great burden had been lifted and I was free to be myself. Have you experienced such a situation or a feeling in your life? Discuss.
Answer:
Yes, it is always true that openness in relationships helps. If we are angry with someone, instead of keeping it a secret and hating the person secretly, it will be useful to discuss the matter ‘ and get out of the negative emotions. Negativity harms both equally.

Question 11.
What do you infer about the relationship between Mrs. Pandit and Gandhiji from reading this lesson?
Answer:
It is very clear that both Gandhiji and Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit felt at ease with each other. There was openness in their relationship. If Gandhiji felt free to tell Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit what he thought of her behaviour, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit had faith in the counsel of Gandhiji. Thus they shared a beautiful relationship of give-and-take.

Question 12.
Describe the state of mind of the cook referred to in the lesson.
Answer:
The cook was drunk and had forgotten what he was supposed to do. Though the occasion was an important one, as the Prime Minister of Great Britain and Lady Eden were visiting Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, the cook had messed up everything by getting drunk. Yet, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit retained her sense of balance and did not let go of her anger. She controlled the situation by remembering Gandhiji’s words, “No one can harm you but yourself.”

C3. The following are some extracts from the lesson. Read them carefully and answer the questions that are given below each of them:

1. “Yet in law, we women were still recognized only through our relationship to men”.

Question a.
Why does the speaker say so?
Answer:
The speaker is bitter that in spite of being a woman of caliber who took part in the freedom struggle of the country, according to Indian law she had existence only in relation to her husband and not independently.

Question b.
What is the mood of the speaker while speaking the words above?
Answer:
She is both angry and bitter. She feels frustrated.

 

2. “No one can harm you except yourself”.

Question a.
Identify the speaker.
Answer:
Gandhiji.

Question b.
Who is the speaker addressing?
Answer:
Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit.

Question c.
What does the speaker mean by the words above?
Answer:
The speaker advises every individual to be in control of himself /herself. Only when there is self-control can one control others and any situation.

3. “I struck back with the same sharp weapon”.

Question a.
Who is the T and who did the speaker strike back at?
Answer:
Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit. She struck back at the opposing delegation at the United Nations.

Question b.
What was the weapon used bp the speaker?
Answer:
Harsh words.

Question c.
What was the need to strike back?
Answer:
Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit’s opponents made personal attacks that were harmful to the prestige of both Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit and her nation – India.

Additional Extracts:

4. ‘In India, we still attach importance to these things.’

Question a.
Who is the speaker?
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhi.

Question b.
What things is he talking about?
Answer:
Courtesy and decency.

Question c.
When did he say these words?
Answer:
When Mrs. Pandit refused to make peace with her relatives.

 

5. ‘To him, means were as important as the end’.

Question a.
Who do the words ‘To him’ refer to?
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhi.

Question b.
What is important, according to him?
Answer:
The methods we use to achieve our goals.

Question c.
When did the speaker think of this?
Answer:
When the South African delegation made personal attacks and Mrs. Pandit retaliated similarly, she was reminded of this.

C4 Discuss the answers for the following questions in a group of 3 or 4 and then present your answers before the other groups.

Question 1.
Mrs. Pandit had to face a lot of humiliating situations in her life. Give a brief account of the situations and comment on them.
Answer:
Mrs. Pandit had to face a lot of humiliating situations in life. Widowed early, she had to fend for herself and her daughters as the law did not entitle a widow or her daughters for a share in the family properly.

Embittered, she wanted to go away but this resentment and bitterness was removed from her heart by the wise counsel of Mahatma Gandhiji that, no one can harm one except oneself.

The second humiliating experience she underwent was when she was the leader of Indian delegation to UN for a debate of India’s complaint regarding the ill-treatment of people of Indian origin in South Africa. The opponents made personal attacks against her and the country and initially, she responded in the same vein.

Recollecting Gandhiji’s advice she apologized to the leader of the opposing delegation and diffused the strained relations. The third humiliation she almost had to face was when she had invited the PM of UK and Lady Eden for a dinner.

Her cook got drunk and dazed and dinner was not ready. Yet again recollecting Gandhiji’s advice, she quickly got food ready and the tense situation was calmed with humour.

Question 2.
Comment on the title of the lesson with respect to Mrs. Pandit’s experiences in different situations in her life.
Answer:
The title of the lesson ‘ The best advice I ever got ‘ is an extremely apt title because whenever Mrs. Pandit faced some difficult or unpleasant situation, the advice given by Mahatma Gandhi came to her rescue and helped her overcome her problems.

Each time she faced some bitterness or resentment, the advice is given by Mahatma Gandhi that, no one can harm one except oneself, helped her remove her negative feelings and solve the problem in a positive way. She was able to apply this counsel and overcome any difficulty in life. It was like a universal cure for all diseases.

 

Question 3.
From a reading of the lesson, write a note on Mrs. Pandit’s accomplishments and her contributions to India.
Answer:
We’can see that Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was a woman of substance. After losing her husband, when she was made to understand that she was not entitled to her husband’s property, she resented the idea that her identity was established only through her husband. She was displeased that though she had fought, just as men had, for the freedom of India, according to the age-old ideas of conventional people, she had no individual existence.

But she was a woman of strength and calibre. That is why she had the privilege of heading the Indian delegation to the United Nations. We can see from the excerpt that she was a good hostess too. She had the ability to manage a difficult situation and turn it into a pleasant one.

Question 4.
“Means are as important as the end”, said Gandhiji. Do you agree with this view? Justify your answer.
Answer:
I agree with this view totally. Ends are no doubt very important to everyone but how one achieves it, is more important. Everyone works for achieving an ideal or goal one has. But in the process of achieving the goal, one should not veer from the right path. The idea of achieving one’s goal through hook or crook is not ethical.

The satisfaction one gets, in the end, will not be genuine and wholehearted. Even if one does not achieve one’s goal but goes about persevering in the true way, the satisfaction one gets in trying is far better than the satisfaction of attaining the goal. Therefore means are as important as the end.

Question 5.
Assume yourself to be a social activist. Write an article suggesting ways and means of removing gender discrimination that still exists in our society. You can discuss in groups and write down the article.
Answer:
Gender discrimination starts even before birth. When the child is in the womb itself, if the sex is determined to be female, there is the danger of foeticide. After birth, girl children run the risk of infanticide. When they grow up, they are discriminated against in the field of education. When it comes to marriage, employed girls will have to give up their jobs to adjust with the family pattern of their husbands.

Those who continue to work, have to reject offers of promotion if it means going away from their families. With children coming into the picture, employment becomes a bigger problem. In addition, there is a fear of physical assault.

Thus, there is discrimination against girls at every stage. If this has to end, there should be a radical change in the way society looks at girls. This is possible only when there are more and more awareness programmes which erase from the consciousness of people the idea that girls are inferior to boys. This is not an easy task because beginning with the mass media to religion, all-powerful influences in society showgirls playing second fiddle to men. But tasks which are challenging shouldn’t be given up.

We should try and accomplish such tasks with greater resolve. Individuals and governments should join hands to bring about the much needed progressive change in society by giving more and more incentives to girl children in education and employment. There should also be stringent punishment to those who go against women’s parity and empowerment.

Additional Questions:

Question 1.
Who gave Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit the best advice?
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhi.

Question 2.
Why was Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit going through a. period of anguish?
Answer:
Her husband had died recently and her deep sorrow over his loss was followed by the realization that she would not get any share of the property, by virtue of being a woman.

 

Question 3.
Why does Mrs. Pandit say that in the eyes of Indian law she had no individual existence?
Answer:
At that time, Indian law denied women any share in the family property. In spite of working as hard as men, a woman was recognized only through her relationship to a man. Therefore, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit says that in the eyes of the Indian law a woman had no individual existence.

Question 4.
Why was Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit bitter towards the members of her family?
Answer:
Even the members of her family supported the antiquated law. Therefore, she was bitter towards the members of her family.

Question 5.
What did Gandhiji enquire of Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit when she visited him?
Answer:
Gandhiji asked Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit if she had made peace with her relatives.

Question 6.
What did Gandhiji tell Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit to do? Why?
Answer:
Gandhiji told her to go to her relatives and say good¬bye to them. According to him, in India, courtesy and decency demanded it. In India, people still gave importance to such things.

Question 7.
What was the result of her visit to her husband’s family?
Answer:
Her visit brought a feeling of relief to everyone. She asked for their best wishes before starting on a new stage of her life. By doing this, she experienced a miraculous effect upon herself. She also felt that a great burden had been lifted off her and that she was free to be herself.

 

Question 8.
What unhappy situation occurred in the United Nations when Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit went there as the leader of the Indian delegation? How did she resolve it?
Answer:
The United Nations had to resolve India’s complaint regarding the treatment of people of Indian origin in South Africa. Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was the leader of the Indian delegation. When the issue came up, harsh things were said by both sides and the opponents even made personal attacks harmful to India’s prestige as well as Mrs. Pandit’s. Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit did not accept it silently. She gave it back in the same coin. Due to this, an unpleasant atmosphere was created.

After a duel of words, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit suddenly thought of Gandhiji. She felt that he would never have approved of her way of retaliation. For him, means had to be as good as the end. Gandhiji would not be happy if questionable tactics were used for succeeding.

After thinking about this, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit decided that at any cost she would not make personal attacks to score a cheap point. When she changed her mind and stuck to a dignified method, the opponents met them on the new level and from then on, the case was argued on its merits only. In this way, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit resolved the situation.

Question 9.
How did a recurring nightmare become a reality in Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit’s life?
Answer:
A recurring nightmare that women have is, someone important has come for dinner, it is time to eat – but dinner is not ready. This almost came true once for Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit. When Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was the High Commissioner for India in the United Kingdom, she had once invited the Prime Minister of Great Britain and Lady Eden for dinner. Everything was planned meticulously. When the guests arrived and drinks were served twice, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit signalled the butler to announce dinner.

Even as they waited, the third round of drinks came. Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit excused herself and went to the kitchen to find out why dinner was not served. To her dismay, she found that the cook was totally drunk and was talking nonsense. Nothing was cooked and the other servants were frightened.

Question 10.
How did Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit react to the status of the chaotic kitchen and what decision did she take?
Answer:
At first, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was totally upset. She wanted to shout at the cook and dismiss him immediately. But the very next moment she remembered the words of Gandhiji, which had calmed her so many times in the past – that, if she lost control, she would only hurt herself. Therefore, she pulled herself together. The immediate thing to be done was to provide food for the guests. Therefore, she asked the others in the kitchen to co-operate. All of them did and though the menu described was different, food could still be served.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
According to Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, the best advice she ever had came from
A) Jawaharlal Nehru
B) Maulana Azad
C) Mahatma Gandhi
D) Lala Lajpat Rai
Answer:
C) Mahatma Gandhi

 

Question 2.
Mrs. Pandit was passing through a period of anguish because
A) she had lost her property
B) she had no individual existence
C) she had lost her husband
D) she had participated in the struggle for freedom
Answer:
C) she had lost her husband

Question 3.
The galling position Mrs. Pandit resented was
A) she was a.widow
B) she was not entitled to any share of the family property
C) she had no individual existence
D) she was without a son.
Answer:
B) she was not entitled to any share of the family property

Question 4.
Mrs. Pandit was bitter towards her family members because
A) she lost her husband
B) women were recognized through their relationship to men
C) they supported the antiquated law
D) her belief in humanity was at a low ebb.
Answer:
C) they supported the antiquated law

Question 5.
Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit realised the importance of Gandhiji’s advice when she
A) went to America
B) refused to have anything to do with her relatives
C) telephoned her brother-in-law
D) met and made peace with her family members
Answer:
D) met and made peace with her family members

Question 6.
Mrs. Pandit lifted the debate back to where it belonged by
A) refusing to retaliate to personal attacks
B) refusing to score a cheap point
C) arguing the case on its merits
D) walking out of the meeting
Answer:
D) walking out of the meeting

 

Question 7.
When Mrs. Pandit found that her cook had not prepared food, she
A) dismissed him
B) dismissed the maid and the housekeeper
C) cooked food with the help of others
D) apologized to the guests.
Answer:
C) cooked food with the help of others

Question 8.
The opposite of the word ‘Courteous’ is
A) uncourteous
B) non courteous
C) discourteous
D) in courteous
Answer:
C) discourteous

Language Activities:

1. Vocabulary

V1. Dictionary work:

Complete the words beginning with ‘re………’ which mean the phrases given against each of them.

make a decision : re………….
state that one is unwilling to do something : re……………
take revenge or hit back : re………….
feel bitter about : re……………..
connected with, concerning : re…………..
a feeling of reassurance and relaxation after stress is over : re……………..
latest, fresh : re…………….
keep, preserve : re…………….
Answer:

Resolve
Refuse
Retaliate
Resent
Regarding
Relief
Recent
Retain.
V2. Classify the following qualities into desirable and undesirable:

for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had 4

Desirable quality Undesirable quality
sincere galling
advantageous quarrelsome
decent difficult
courteous bitter
happy harmful
humble hysterical
significant
prestigious
diplomatic
2. Grammar And Usage:

G1. Formation of Nouns:

Question A.
Work in pairs and change the following verbs into nouns. Then check your answers in the dictionary.
perform, continue, react, realize, treat, observe, express, involve, agitate, interact, confront, explain, enter, allow, achieve, enroll, admit, free, judge.
Answer:

perform – performance (performer)
continue – continuation (continuity, continuance)
react – reaction (reactor)
realize – realization
treat – treatment
observe – observation (observer)
express – expression involvement agitation (agitator) interaction
involve – involvement
agitate – agitation(agitator)
interact – interaction
confront – confrontation (confronter)
explain – explanation
enter – entrance (entrant)
allow – allowance
achieve – achievement (achiever)
enroll – enrolment (enroller)
admit – admission (admittance)
free – freedom
judge – judgment.
Question B.
The pair “greatest soul” is made up of an “adjective + noun” (the adjective “greatest” qualifies the noun “soul”) Pick out such pairs from the lesson and classify them into adjectives and nouns.
Answer:
Adjectives + Nouns: The best advice, sunny afternoon, most people, low ebb, deep sorrow, humiliating realization, Indian law, individual existence, Indian women, national struggle, family property, two daughters, galling position, antiquated law, outworn law, humiliating situation, new country, loved one, sorrow enough (note: in this example, the adjective comes after the noun), further injury, own heart, severe struggle, good wishes, new stage, great burden, a small gesture, significant change, the Indian delegation, Indian origin, harsh lines, both sides, personal attacks, sharp weapons, distressing duel, long run, questionable tactics, cheap point, new level, last day, opposing delegation, small matters, recurring nightmare, shocking sight.

 

Question C.
Combine the following pairs of sentences by changing the adjective(s) in italics to a noun(s).

Rajesh is a very amiable person. It has endeared him to his colleagues.
The actor was famous. It got him many endorsements.
The young businessman was extravagant. It led to his downfall.
James was silent during the enquiry. It did not help the police in bringing the culprit to book.
Answer:

Rajesh’s amiability has endeared him to his colleagues.
The amiability of Rajesh has endeared him to his colleagues.
The actor’s fame got him many endorsements.
The fame of the actor got him many endorsements.
The young businessman’s extravagance led to his downfall.
The extravagance of the young businessman led to his downfall.
James’s silence during the enquiry did not help the police in bringing the culprit to book.
G2. Formation of verbs:

Question 1.
Make new verbs with the following words. Then use them in sentences of your own.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had 5
Answer:

Bath – bathe:
Many have the habit of humming a tune when they bathe.
Courage – encourage:
Teachers should encourage their students to think originally.
Force – enforce:
It is the job of the police to enforce the law.
Food – feed:
She was upset as she could not feed her child before, leaving for office.
Joy – enjoy:
Ratan did not enjoy the outing with his friends as he was ill.
Memory – memorize:
Radhika did not memorize her speech well enough.
Prison – imprison:
Since Sushil had obtained anticipatory bail, the police could not arrest him.
Slave – enslave:
Poverty enslaves millions of Indians and deprives them of happiness.
Speech – speak:
The shocked parents could not speak even a word.
Sympathy – sympathize:
We sympathized with our friend who was scolded by the principal for no fault of hers.
Clear – clarify:
The speaker could not clarify our doubts.
Civil – civilize:
It is impossible to civilize barbarians.
G3. Answer the following:

A. Pick out the adverbs used in the lesson and frame sentences using them:

Recently: Ramesh was promoted recently to the post of supervisor.
Finally: Finally the police were able to apprehend the culprit.
Lightly: One should not approach the question of corruption lightly.
Suddenly: Suddenly it started raining.
Warmly: Though angry with us, my aunt spoke to us warmly.
Hardly: Hardly do we get a free day to relax.
Meticulously: Sindhu meticulously planned the educational tour.
Greatly: Many people have been greatly affected by demonetization.
Really: I was really grateful to my friend who reminded me about my promise to my colleague.
B. Choose the right word and rewrite the following sentences:

Bill is a careful/carefully driver.
Can you please repeat that slow/slowly?
The party was very good/well. I enjoyed it very much.
Tom didn’t do very good/well in his examination.
Come on, George! Why are you always so slow/slowly?
Our team played bad/badly.
John! I need your help quick/quickly.

Answer:

Bill is a careful driver.
Can you please repeat that slowly?
The party was very good. I enjoyed it very much.
Tom didn’t do very well in his examination.
Come on, George! Why are you always so slow?
Our team played badly.
John! I need your help quickly.
G4. In a group of four, share each part of speech and complete the following table by filling the empty columns.

Noun Verb Adjective Adverb
Ex: continuation continue continuous continuously
1) realization
2) powerfully
3) beautify
4) pleasant
5) agreement
6) enjoy
7) care
8) danger
9) expressive
10) courageously
Answer:

Noun Verb Adjective Adverb
1) realization realize real really
2) power empower powerful powerfully
3) beauty beautify beautiful beautifully
4) pleasantness please pleasant pleasantly
5) agreement agree agreeable agreeably
6) enjoyment enjoy enjoyable enjoyably
7) care care careful carefully
8) danger endanger dangerous dangerously
9) expression express expressive expressively
10)courage encourage courageous courageously
G5. Words used as Nouns and Verbs.

Make sentences using the words given in the box below as nouns and as verbs.
for Class 9 English Prose Chapter 1 The Best Advice I Ever Had 6

view: The view from the mountain top was beautiful. (N)
The situation was viewed differently by different people. (V)
drop: Could you give me a drop to the railway station?
Could you drop me at the railway station?
design: The design of your blouse is exclusive.
Who designs your blouses?
walk: I took a walk to my aunt’s place.
I walked to my aunt’s place.
distance: The distance between my home and school is not much.
I want to distance myself from Sneha as I find her quarrelsome.
need: Demonetisation was the need of the hour.
We need to curb corruption at all costs.
treat: You should give me a treat tomorrow.
Will you treat me to ice cream?
delight: It is a sheer delight to listen to our principal.
Our principal delights us with her witty remarks.
Writing Skill:

Dialogue Writing

A. Can money buy happiness? Develop your ideas with the help of the points given below. Use your ideas and write a paragraph on the topic.

Yes, because money No, because money doesn’t
buys house/clothes/car…. get you health, happiness…
Yes, because of money:
The value of money in one’s life is a strange idea to deal with. When we think of basic needs such as shelter and clothes and other luxuries such as fancy cars and mobiles, we consider money to be very important. We even conclude that in order to be happy, we need money. While it is true that we need money to fulfill our physical comforts and luxuries, it is equally true that happiness goes beyond this. We have seen that extremely wealthy people are not happy, for various reasons.

Sometimes the cause of unhappiness is a mental or physical disorder. Some other times, it is the self-destructive act of doing wrong in society to amass wealth and then suffering from pangs of guilt. At times like these, we realise that money is not everything and more than the money we need peace and tranquillity. Hence it is important that we earn money through just methods and also help the less fortunate, and live with dignity.

No, because money doesn’t:
Money is not everything in life. It may buy a lot of things to keep us comfortable but it cannot buy us the most essential things such as health and happiness. A person with the greatest riches may still be unhappy for some reason, while one without any riches might be blissful. Similarly, it is well said that “health is wealth”. No one can buy good health by paying money. A healthy mind exists in a healthy body. For this, money may not do much. It is the mental attitude that matters. In India, we come across any number of simple persons who do not aspire for money at all but still are happy. Happiness is a state of mind and money has no part to play there.

B. Know your Idioms:

a penny for your thoughts
a chance in a million
two sides of the same coin
a million-dollar question
as good as gold
to cash in on
thirty pieces of silver
What are you thinking about?
either no chance at all or a very slim chance
two contrasting characters in the same category
a very crucial question very well behaved to take advantage of
the money paid to Judas Iscariot for an act of betrayal.

The Best Advice I Ever Had by Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit About the Author

Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit (1900-1990) was an Indian diplomat, politician, and a sister of India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru. She was active in the Indian freedom movement and held high national and international positions. She was greatly influenced by Gandhiji and became identified with the struggle for independence. She was imprisoned by the British on different occasions.

After her husband’s death in 1944, she traveled to the United States, mainly on a lecture tour. After India’s independence, she entered the diplomatic service and became India’s Ambassador to the Soviet Union, the United States, Mexico, Ireland (during which time she was also the Indian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom), and Spain. In 1953, she became the first woman President of the United Nations General Assembly. Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit died on December 1, 1990.

The Best Advice I Ever Had Summary in English
‘The Best Advice I Ever Had’ is an article by Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit. In this article, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit refers to some of the hard and humiliating situations she went through in her life when she lost her husband prematurely. When already mourning her husband’s death, she felt further humiliated by knowing that the Indian law was not helpful to her. The family share was not given to her, as she was a widow with two daughters and without a son. She had bitterness towards her family members.

When she met Gandhiji, he made her realise the complexity of the situation and advised her to overcome it. He pointed out the importance of making peace with others. Forgiving others is the only way to keep us in peace. His advice gradually changed her life. After hearing the advice of Gandhiji she phoned her brother-in-law. Her visit brought a feeling of relief to everyone.

She had applied the advice of Gandhiji when she was involved in heated arguments in a conference held at the United Nations. When she was in New York, as the leader of the Indian delegation to the United Nations, India complained about the treatment of people of Indian origin in South Africa. Harsh things were exchanged and her opponents made personal attacks.

She struck back with the same sharp weapon. But soon she realized that the debate diverted from the original issue. She suddenly thought of Gandhiji. She realized that, for Gandhiji, the means were as important as the end. From then on Mrs. Pandit refrained from personal attacks and concentrated on the original issue. The opponents were forced to follow her. Thus, Mrs. Pandit lifted the debate to where it belonged.

Also, when the Prime Minister and Lady Eden had come for dinner, she was in a difficult situation which she solved peacefully. The Prime Minister and Lady Eden arrived for dinner and everything was planned meticulously. But everything fell apart as the cook was drunk. However, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit negotiated the situation intelligently. She knew that there was no point in arguing with the drunken cook. So she improvised with what she had and earned the appreciation of the guests. Thus we see that, by following Gandhiji’s advice, Mrs. Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit was successful professionally and personally.

Glossary:

anguish (n): severe mental or physical pain or suffering
at a low ebb: being low in spirit/at low level
humiliating: embarrassing
resent (v): feel bitter about
galling (adj): annoying
antiquated (adj): outdated
courtesy (n): good manners, polite speech or action
inflict (v): impose, cause
gesture (n): action, activity
duel (n): fight, clash
retaliate (v): hit back, strike back, react
perspective (n): point of view, outlook
meticulously (adv): carefully
ladle (n): serving spoon
glazed (adj): blank, dull
hysterical (adj): crazy
the pivot of existence: the main cause for existence, only means of existence.

 

9th English Medium Chapter. 1 . The Best Advice I Ever Had.

The Portrait Of The Lady.

Chapter On Saying Please.

Chapter/Prose Mauritius.

Chapter/Prose An Astrologers Day.

Chapter/Prose A question Of Space – Questions And Answers.

Chapter – The Collecters.

Chapter – The Story Teller.

Chapter – The Best Advice I Ever Had.

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